Resume Template: Bank Teller

by | Resume Templates, Resume Templates: Finance

Are you good with numbers and customer interaction? Great! Time to show it off on your bank teller resume!

Going to the bank is part of everyday life for most people, so as a bank teller you’ll be providing an essential service.

You’ll also have an opportunity to grow relationships with your regular customers and provide them with a positive banking experience.

You want to be the teller they prefer.

But before you get to that stage, you’ll have to land the job first.

We’re here to help you do just that.

We’re going to show you how to write a bank teller resume that is sure to impress and get you the job of your dreams.

So where to begin?

To help get you started, we’re going to outline the essentials.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample bank teller resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best bank teller you possibly can.

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Bank Teller Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Sharon Geswin
sharongeswin@email.com
1 (614) 564-0988
Columbus, OH 43081
linkedin.com/sharongeswin

Summary Statement:

Bank Teller: Experienced Bank Teller dedicated to customer satisfaction and skilled at processing transactions accurately and timely with an emphasis on customer service. Adept with large transfers and detailed management, capable of operating within both small-town banks and large corporate branches.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Efficiency
  • Accuracy
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Checking, Savings, and Line of Credit Accounts
  • MS Office
  • Accounting
  • Ethical

Professional Experience:

Bank of America | Columbus, OH
Teller | May 2017–Present

  • Handle multiple customer accounts on a daily basis
  • Process cash for withdrawals and deposits
  • Monitor transfers and loan payments
  • Excel at customer interaction and recognition
  • Identify counterfeit currency and reported to superiors

Highland Bank | Columbus, OH
Teller | June 2015–March 2017

  • Balanced cash drawer at closing
  • Made loan referrals for cars and homes
  • Required identity confirmation from customers
  • Developed professional rapport with customers
  • Helped customers fill out credit card applications

Ashville Hometown Bank | Ashville, OH
Teller | March 2013–May 2015

  • Addressed customer inquiries about deposits, withdrawals, and lines of credit
  • Opened new accounts and closed existing accounts
  • Followed all bank rules and security measures
  • Provided customer support for online banking

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Arts in Finance
Concentration: Financial Accounting

The University of Ohio, Columbus, OH
Class of 2014

Formatting

Numbers never lie. If calculated correctly, they’ll always give you an accurate result.

A good bank teller resume is a sum of its individual parts.

Each part must be assembled correctly.

It all starts with formatting.

Proper formatting has become essential, especially now that so many companies are using scanning bots to evaluate resumes for keywords and language. You want your bank teller resume to make the grade.

Additionally, the average resume is looked over by a hiring manager for a mere six seconds.

So the readability of your resume is of utmost importance.

To achieve good formatting, you’ll need to layout your resume in reverse chronological order.

Your most recent position will be listed first, followed by second most recent, and so on.

This way, the reader can quickly grasp what you’ve been doing lately in your professional and working life.

Pay attention to font selection. Choose a font that is sensible and easy to read.

Make good use of the white spaces on your resume page. You don’t want the reader to be distracted by a cluttered look.

So make sure that your columns, bullet lists, and paragraphs are properly aligned.

Start With Your Resume Summary

Remember, six seconds.

So you need to make a good first impression, and fast!

Your bank teller resume summary begins your resume and is at the top of the page.

In 2–3 sentences, you’ll need to summarize what you’re all about in your working life.

What makes you an excellent bank teller?

Your summary needs to be a compact selection of the very best of your professional qualities.

What specific skills make you stand out from the crowd of other applicants?

A sharp and detailed summary is the best way to gain the attention of busy hiring managers.

And you want that attention!

PRO TIP : Resumes used to be headed by a statement of objective rather than a summary of qualifications. However, this is no longer common practice. Employers these days want to cut to the chase. They want to know exactly what makes you qualified. They already know you want the job. So forget the objective and go straight to your skill set.

All right, let’s have a look at an effective summary, followed by a summary that’s not so great.

Yes!

Experienced Bank Teller dedicated to customer satisfaction and skilled at processing transactions accurately and quickly, with an emphasis on customer service. Adept at large transfers and detailed management. Capable of operating within both small-town banks and large corporate branches.

No!

Bank Teller with experience processing different types of transactions. Have worked at both small and large banks. I am looking for a bank teller position that is flexible and offers good hours.

The first example instills the reader with confidence in the applicant’s skill level. We can see that this person is highly qualified, not only for the mechanics of transaction processing but also in customer service.

Power words are used to add a sense of action and confidence to the summary.

In contrast, the second summary is a very general statement, using minimal detail.

Not much to learn here.

It also uses an objective, which when coupled with the unimpressive qualifications, gives this summary a demanding air, as if the potential employer is up for evaluation instead of the candidate.

Not the attitude you want to convey as an applicant.

Take time to assemble your summary. Pinpoint and emphasize your best skills and qualities in the field.

Don’t rush it.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

Your summary is presented in a paragraph format. It’s your introduction and is therefore very important.

But to emphasize the skills in your summary, you’ll need to compile a list of Key Accomplishments, or Areas of Expertise.

These are the things that set you apart.

Perhaps you have more skill in a certain area than other candidates.

Now is the time to bring it forward.

Your Areas of Expertise should be a bulleted list.

This formatting packs a punch because it’s easy to read and gets to the point.

Example:

  • Efficiency
  • Accuracy
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Checking, Savings, and Line of Credit Accounts
  • MS Office
  • Accounting
  • Ethical

Don’t leave anything important off your list!

To get started making your list, you’ll need to carefully consider your relevant hard skills and soft skills.

Hard skills are directly related to your profession. They can be skills you learned on the job or during your education.

If it directly applies to the position you’re seeking, list it.

Soft skills are your personal qualifications, the attitudes and abilities you bring to the job. Things like critical thinking, interpersonal skills, and ability to work through problems.

When you’ve assembled your list, look it over again and refine the skills if necessary.

PRO TIP : Remember to keep your skills list relevant, and to balance your hard skills and soft skills. After all, you can be as technically qualified for the job as possible, but if you lack the personal attributes to put that knowledge into action, you’re going to come up short employment-wise.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Listing Your Work Experience

You’ve got your summary and areas of expertise down.

Now it’s time to really put the stamp on your bank teller resume with your work experience section.

It’s the centerpiece of your resume.

It will show how you’ve been using your skills out there in the working world.

So let’s get it down right!

Let’s begin with layout.

What do you include?

Certainly, not every job you’ve ever worked. Just those positions that are relevant to the job you’re pursuing.

Remember that reverse chronological order is the layout to use here.

List your most recent position, then work backwards in time.

As you lay out your work history, be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

Including dates of employment is good practice.

But what if you were only employed for a short time in a position, or what if your work history has significant gaps of time between jobs?

If either is the case, you may choose to leave dates off your bank teller resume.

However, keep in mind that you will probably be asked about the length of employment in an interview situation. You will also be asked about gaps. So, regardless of what you’ve put on your resume, be prepared with answers to questions about dates.

Your day-to-day functions in the job should be listed as bullet points.

Remember to use power words to demonstrate competence and ability.

3–5 bullet points should be sufficient to accurately convey your roles in the position and how you fulfilled those roles/functions.

Some examples:

Yes!

Bank of America | Columbus, OH | Teller | May 2017–Present

  • Handle multiple customer accounts on a daily basis
  • Process cash for withdrawals and deposits
  • Monitor transfers and loan payments
  • Excel at customer interaction and recognition
  • Identify counterfeit currency and report to superiors

No!

Bank of America | Columbus, OH

  • Did withdrawals and deposits
  • Transfers and loan payments
  • Talked with customers
  • Discovered counterfeit money and told boss

The first example communicates professionalism and competence, right?

The five points provide enough detail and demonstrate ability and action.

Power words are used effectively and really drive home the skills of the candidate.

The second example is lacking in detail and is unpolished overall.

The list provides only a very general overview of the applicant’s roles in the position, and no sense of actual skill level can be determined.

This is the opposite of what you want to convey!

PRO TIP: Power words can turn a mediocre bullet list into one that really impresses. For added effectiveness, examine the description of the job you’re seeking for power word options. Use those same power words in your work history section to really appeal to the potential employer.

More About Bots

Your potential employer may use what’s known as an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). Remember the scanning bots we mentioned? An ATS uses bots to scan resumes.

Only the most relevant resumes are selected.

In order to satisfy an ATS, there are several formatting/layout alterations you can make with your bank teller resume.

For instance, you can opt for a paragraph format when writing your work experience.

So instead of bullet points:

Bank of America | Columbus, OH | Teller | May 2017–Present

  • Handle multiple customer accounts on a daily basis
  • Process cash for withdrawals and deposits
  • Monitor transfers and loan payments
  • Excel at customer interaction and recognition
  • Identify counterfeit currency and report to superiors

You’d use a paragraph:

Handle and manage multiple customer accounts on a daily basis. Process cash for withdrawals, deposits, and other transactions. Monitor transfers and loan payments as needed. Excel at customer interaction and recognition, and initiate conversation.

Or you could use partial bullet points to highlight special achievements or qualifications.

Handle and manage multiple customer accounts on a daily basis. Process cash for withdrawals, deposits, and other transactions. Monitor transfers and loan payments as needed. Excel at customer interaction and recognition, and initiate conversation.

  • Identify counterfeit currency and report to superiors
  • Help grow customer base by 10% during period employed

A paragraph format enables you to pile on the keywords, which an ATS will love.

However, a considerable downside to the paragraph format is that it’s harder to read when your bank teller resume makes it to human eyes.

So it’s a gamble.

We recommend adhering to strict bullet points unless you’re really confident that an ATS poses a significant hurdle for your resume.

Writing Your Education Section

To sum up your bank teller resume, you’ll want to list your education.

Did you receive specific training for your job, or do you possess a more general degree?

Whatever the case, your potential employer will want to know.

List the highest level of education you’ve received.

Example: High school Diploma, Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree, etc.

Start by writing your area of study and the institution you attended. Be sure to include minor degrees and areas of concentration.

If you’re a recent grad, feel free to add the date of graduation and your GPA.

Also include any academic accomplishments.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts in Finance
Concentration: Financial Accounting

The University of Ohio, Columbus, OH
GPA: 3.5
Class of 2014

Perhaps you’ve attended conferences or workshops for your field. Include an entry for those as well.

Example:

    • “Banking 101,” Professional Workshop, Columbus, OH
    • “Online Banking,” Conference, Columbus, OH

Additional Sections

Have an impressive accomplishment that doesn’t seem to fit in any of the resume sections we’ve covered?

You can add an additional section to your bank teller resume!

This can be particularly helpful if you lack actual work experience in the field you’re pursuing.

Consider adding:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience?

Maybe you haven’t worked in a while, or perhaps you’re changing careers or just starting out.

Don’t let lack of experience discourage you from writing a bank teller resume.

There are things you can do to tailor a resume to what experience you do have.

One option is to move your education section up on the page so that it follows your summary.

If you’re just starting out in the professional world, your education credentials are likely going to be your strongest selling point.

Also, your work history bullet points should be altered as needed to align with the position you’re seeking. Make them as relevant as possible.

What jobs have you done or skills have you acquired that could relate to the position of bank teller?

Have you ever held a position that required data entry?

How about customer service?

Were you involved in a job that required quick thinking and accuracy?

Experience like this certainly qualifies as relevant!

Bank Teller Resume Points to Remember

Let’s go over some important things to remember.

Include a way to be contacted

Not as easy to remember as you’d think, especially if you’re eager to get your resume sent off.
List your LinkedIn profile, email address, home address, or telephone number. Just make sure they can reach you.

Use space effectively

A good resume needs to make an impression quickly. Using your space wisely will help to achieve this end. Your most important skills need to be at the top of the page in your summary, followed by your expertise points, your work history, and then your education information.

Use good power words

Conveying ability and action through language is an important aspect of good resume writing. There are so many great power words to choose from. Use them wisely and use a variety of them!

Use a proofreader

Having someone you trust give your resume a look-over can only help you. Sometimes it takes an extra set of eyes to catch any grammar or spelling mistakes you may have missed.

Try to Avoid

As you draft your bank teller resume, keep these things in mind:

No first person language

It is not acceptable to use “I” or “me” when writing your resume. It may feel odd not to do so, but remember that your resume should be a sharp and professional document of your relevant skills.

No more than one page

Unless you’re a CEO, a single page should be sufficient to convey your relevant skills and credentials. One page is also easy to handle.

No repetition

Repeating yourself is a sure way to get your resume tossed out of the pile. So take the time to keep your language fresh. And remember to use those power words!

No crazy fonts

A clean and simple font helps make your resume readable, which is what you want. Stay away from artistic or flowery fonts.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Helpful Tools:

Bank Teller Resume Power Words

  • Handle
  • Process
  • Monitor
  • Excel
  • Identify
  • Balanced
  • Made
  • Required
  • Developed
  • Helped
  • Addressed
  • Opened
  • Followed
  • Provided

Bank Teller Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
MS OfficeOrganization
AccountingConflict Resolution
Checking/Savings AccountsEthical
Line of Credit AccountsEfficiency