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HOW TO ANSWER: Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?

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Where do you see yourself in five years? This interview question is not designed to test your psychic powers.

No interviewer expects candidates to be able to describe EXACTLY what they will be doing in 1,820 days. In fact, a truthful answer about what you HOPE to be doing can easily sabotage your odds of landing a job offer.

So why do interviewers insist on asking this question?

Why Interviewers Ask, “Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?”

The interviewer wants to understand more about your career goals and how this position would fit into your grand plan. They care about your career goals because they want to hire someone who is motivated, proactive, and likely to stick around and work hard if hired.

If succeeding in this role is important to you as part of your long-term career strategy, you are much more likely to perform well.

You may also hear one of these similar/related questions that are not quite as cliched as the old “5 years” chestnut:

  • What are your long-term career goals?
  • What is your ideal job at this stage in your career?
  • What are you looking for?
  • How do you define success?
  • What’s most important to you in you career?

How to Answer The Question

In today’s competitive job market, interviewers are looking for any red flag to use as an excuse not to hire someone. So you could be unfairly eliminated from contention if you answer this question in a way that even hints this is not the one and only job of your dreams.

Understandably, an employer wants to hire someone who is truly excited about the job at hand, someone who sees it as a great career move and will work tirelessly to do a good job.

You may have already said that you’re interested in the job and why. But they are testing you further by asking, “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

If your five-year goal is to become an investment banker, it’s going to be hard for them to believe that this position as an IT marketing manager is your dream job.

Hiring managers don’t generally enjoy recruiting, hiring, and training new people. It can be a time-consuming and difficult process. Your interviewer does not want to invest time and effort in someone who is already planning to leave for something better as soon as it comes along (whether that’s a job that’s a better fit, grad school, or your own business).

After all, if she hires you and you quit after a month or two, she’s going to look really bad to her bosses.

In reality, you are probably considering a few different potential career paths. It’s smart for you to keep your options open to a certain extent. However, you don’t have to advertise this fact in your job interviews.

Let’s be clear: You should never lie during a job interview. However, that doesn’t mean that you have to be 100% candid about all of the directions that you are investigating.

So what should you say?

1. Keep your answer fairly general, especially if you don’t know a lot about the typical career path at the company. For most interview questions, I recommend being SPECIFIC because general answers tend to be bland and easily forgettable. This is the exception. Make your answer truthful, but broad enough that it doesn’t raise doubts about whether you would be a good fit for this position at this organization.

2. Stress your interest in a long-term career at the company (especially if you have short job tenures on your resume). Your interviewer wants to know that you’re ready to settle in and grow with the firm. The truth is that anything can happen. The company could go out of business, they could lay you off, or you could be lured away for a better opportunity.

However, remember that the organization is going to be investing considerable time, energy, and money in hiring and training someone for this job. You must at least show an honest intention to stay long enough to be a good investment. If you have some “job hopping” on your resume, it’s particularly important to make the case that you’re now ready for a long-term role.

3. Demonstrate your enthusiasm for the job as an exciting next step for you. Most importantly, make it clear that you are motivated to take on this opportunity right now.

Example Answer to “Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?”


Why We Like It:
The emphasis is on growing with the company (he’s a good long-term hire) and taking on new challenges (he’s goal-oriented, proactive), not on a specific title or job description (he’s flexible).

More Example Responses

1. “My goal right now is to find a position at a company where I can grow and take on new challenges over time. Ultimately, I’d like to assume more management responsibilities and get involved in product strategy. But most importantly, I want to work for an organization where I can build a career.”

Why We Like It:
This answer offers some insight into the candidate’s goals and interests (becoming a manager, being involved in product strategy) so it’s not too generic. This response also strongly expresses a desire for a long-term career with the company.

2. “I am driven to be the best at what I do and I want to work somewhere where I’ll have opportunities to develop my skills, take on interesting projects, and work with people I can really learn from. Some of the most innovative thinkers in the industry work here and that’s a big reason why I would love to build a career here.”

Why We Like It:
With this answer, the candidate is emphasizing her focus on learning, performance, and achievement. She is also complimenting the company and its reputation for hiring quality people (including the interviewer, perhaps?). The reference to “building a career here” indicates an interest in sticking around and contributing.

Special Scenarios: Make Your Narrative Believable

In some situations, your answer to this question will be particularly important. If you’re making a career change or this position doesn’t seem like an obvious next step based on your resume, your interviewer may be suspicious about whether you REALLY are committed to this field or just need to make a few bucks until something better comes along.

Nobody wants to hire an applicant who is halfhearted about the job. It’s like dating someone who is using you for free dinners until someone she’s REALLY attracted to comes along.

Your response to “Where do you see yourself in five years?” is your opportunity to sell the interview on your commitment to the career path and the position.

For example, let’s say you were recently laid off after working in academia for five years and are now interviewing for a job in biotechnology management. To be seriously considered, you need to be able to describe why you are excited about making the switch and building a career in biotech. You don’t want to leave the impression that this would only be a temporary diversion until something opens up for you in your “real” field of interest.

This is also relevant for new grads. If your major and internships are in a totally different area, be prepared to talk convincingly about why you want to invest the next five years in this new field represented by the open position.

How Not to Answer “Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?”


1. Don’t overthink it: “Well, that’s a very hard question. I don’t know what I’ll be doing in 5 years….hmmmm….that’s tough.”

In my work with individual clients, I’ve seen this mistake a million times. It’s great that you take the question seriously, but you are not being evaluated based on accuracy of answer. Use your answer to reassure the interviewer that you’re invested in this career path.

2. Don’t be too specific: “I plan to be a VP at a major firm with at least 7 direct reports, a company car, and a salary of 150K (plus options of course).”

Ambition is good. Goals are good. However, if you are too specific, you run the risk of stating goals that are not realistically achievable in the job available. From the interviewer’s perspective, that means you’re not a good fit.

3. Don’t be flaky: “I’d love to be CEO in five years. Then again, I’d also love to be touring with my band if that takes off.”

You can come across as flaky if you seem to have a million different ideas about what you want to do — or if you have zero clear ideas about your future. In reality, many good candidates are exploring different options or are still trying to figure it out. However, a job interview is not a session with your career coach. You want to give the impression that you’re focused and have a plan (even if it’s not the only plan you’re considering).

4. Don’t raise red flags: “Well, I’m not sure. I’m thinking about law school or business school or clown college.”

Many job seekers have long-term visions of going back to school or starting their own business. These are admirable goals, but there’s no need to share them with your interviewer, especially if you’re still weighing your possibilities.

Of course, if you’ve already committed to full-time grad school or another path that will conflict with your ability to perform in the job, it’s only fair to be open about that.

Also, there are some career paths that require advanced degrees and/or other additional training. For example, many finance and management consulting career paths require an MBA. In these cases, it will be expected that your five-year plan will include more schooling.

One Last Word of Advice

Take the time to think about this question and prepare a response. Don’t memorize a script, but practice how you will describe your long-term career plans in a way that will be relevant to the interviewer and help you tell your story about why you’re the best person for the job.

Here is CollegeHumor’s interesting take on this classic interview question.

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Photo Credit: MSVG

Written by

Pamela Skillings

Pamela Skillings is co-founder of Big Interview. As an interview coach, she has helped her clients land dream jobs at companies including Google, Microsoft, Goldman Sachs, and JP Morgan Chase. She also has more than 15 years of experience training and advising managers at organizations from American Express to the City of New York. She is an adjunct professor at New York University and an instructor at the American Management Association.

74 Comment to HOW TO ANSWER: Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?

  • CAca

    Sorry but this question is totally stupid. That’s the better answer I’ve ever heard for a stupid question like this one: I’m so glad you asked! Allow me to bore you for several minutes with a mountain of overly-optimistic BS about my future. I’ll either be happily working for you or winning a Nobel Prize for getting panda bears to hump more. Either way my future is as bright as a pair of albino buttock bathed in sunlight.

  • CAca

    Sorry but this question is totally stupid. That’s the better answer I’ve ever heard for a stupid question like this one: I’m so glad you asked! Allow me to bore you for several minutes with a mountain of overly-optimistic BS about my future. I’ll either be happily working for you or winning a Nobel Prize for getting panda bears to hump more. Either way my future is as bright as a pair of albino buttock bathed in sunlight.

  • CAca

    Sorry but this question is totally stupid. That’s the better answer I’ve ever heard for a stupid question like this one: I’m so glad you asked! Allow me to bore you for several minutes with a mountain of overly-optimistic BS about my future. I’ll either be happily working for you or winning a Nobel Prize for getting panda bears to hump more. Either way my future is as bright as a pair of albino buttock bathed in sunlight.

  • CAca

    Sorry but this question is totally stupid. That’s the better answer I’ve ever heard for a stupid question like this one: I’m so glad you asked! Allow me to bore you for several minutes with a mountain of overly-optimistic BS about my future. I’ll either be happily working for you or winning a Nobel Prize for getting panda bears to hump more. Either way my future is as bright as a pair of albino buttock bathed in sunlight.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • The best way to answer this question is by considering what you might want to achieve in the role in the long term as opposed to what you hope your next role would be. For example, number of sales, number of systems, certifications, level of expertise, number of projects etc. This seems more tangible and aids the quality of interview for the current role.

  • maria

    Hi! I worked for co-operative for the 2.3 years and I quite the job, I am currently working for a different company now . most of the time I fail to answer this question ”Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?

  • Crystal Nguyen

    Hi Pamela,
    Thank you, this article is very helpful.

  • Kirmulla

    Thanks for the hints.It has given me an idea to how should i prepare this question.

  • Christina Butler

    Great answer

  • leo

    How to reply if someone ask “what is your ambition for moving to another city for a job”? please some one answer it….

  • leo

    Hello Pamela,

    How to reply if someone ask “what is your ambition for moving to another city for a job”? please some one answer it….

    Thanks 🙂

  • Mrs. Pedersen

    Ive always wanted to answer this question honestly by saying…. I see myself being married to a really old billionaire man, living in a luxury yacht and traveling the world in style

  • Mrs. Pedersen

    But here is what I normally answer, which is not the most honest answer…..I see myself developing my HR knowledge and being a subject matter expert to others in the HR department.

  • disqus_MKeynes

    Just lie that your very close friend who lives in that city has been asking you to move there and thus you are now you are very interested in settling permanenetly in that city.

  • KSOnline

    I answered this question in an interview honestly (for a laugh) because I was going to get the job anyway. So I said I would be relaxing on a beach in a coastal town (which I wont name) some 2000km away… 5 years to the date that’s exactly where I was and now live a short distance from. At the time I said it, I didn’t think that would ever happen, but I laughed when I remembered what I said.

    I guess if I was asked this question in an job interview now my answer would be:
    In LA having the time of my life at all the VIP events after launching the project I’ve been working on for many years.

  • EYINJU_ELEDUMARE OLUWASEUN

    hello,
    how do you answer this type of question as pre-nursing student. please i really need help on this because i have nursing interview coming up in two weeks time. adult nursing interview at university. thank you for your help.

  • Interesting article, but like the question it is discussing, it makes the same assumption – that the candidate applying for the job is young, and has a career path. I’ve always found that old 5-years question to be slightly ageist.

    For example, what if you are an older worker who has already achieved career goals and is financially secure, but chooses to go to work for another reason?

    I am 55 and I have at least another 11 years of working life before my retirement age. I am financially secure, one pension from a previous employer having just matured. However, I work in IT and enjoy computers and technology, as well as being interested in it. Going to work achieves several things for me: it keeps my technical skills up to date, it allows me to meet new people and enjoy the camaraderie of my colleagues, it provides interesting challenges on a daily basis… oh and I get paid as well! As they say “Enjoy what you do, and you’ll never work a day in your life”.

    So in five years’ time, I would hope that I am still working, still enjoying it and still earning money that allows me to indulge in the odd Caribbean cruise or two. Not the ambitions of a 30 year old, perhaps, but is my answer so wrong?

    As I said, I find the question to be ageist, and I’m surprised employers are still allowed to ask it.

  • Maks

    I answered this question with, “besties with the CEO” and the interviewers laughed and brought it up later as a response they loved. But then again, not everyone has the charisma to pull off a risky answer like that…

  • Oppah Io

    Hey, at least it’s better than…

    “If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?”

  • theo07

    I believe is more important to focus on making the present right than spending too much thought on the future. The future will come regardless.