HVAC is a constantly evolving industry with high customer demand, and your HVAC resume should reflect your strongest selling points.

Innovation is highly valued and encouraged as those in the field strive to make heating, ventilation, and cooling more efficient and environmentally friendly.

Suffice it to say that a career in HVAC is a wise choice with lots of opportunities.

Whether you’re just starting out in HVAC or advancing your career, you’ll need a well-crafted HVAC resume to help streamline the process.

With your HVAC resume, you’ll want to accurately communicate your skills and expertise so that potential employers can ascertain your value.

It takes more than simply writing down your work history though. Your resume will require proper structure and focus.

You’ll need to know the “Do’s” and “Don’ts” of writing a resume, from proper formatting to font selection.

So let’s get into it!

A good place to start is with an overview of the essential elements in every polished resume.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample HVAC resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best HVAC resume you possibly can.

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HVAC Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Corey Gelding
coreygelding@gmail.com
1 (717) 576-7051
Harrisburg, PA 17110
linkedin.com/coreygelding

Summary Statement:

HVAC Technician: Versatile HVAC Technician with experience installing systems in a variety of structures including private homes and commercial buildings. Demonstrable history of accurately inspecting, replacing, and cleaning system components in addition to advanced knowledge of electrical controls. Skilled at blueprint evaluation and presenting HVAC system plans to clients.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Blueprint Interpretation
  • Efficiency
  • Pneumatic Controls
  • Troubleshooting
  • System Diagnostics
  • HVAC Repair
  • HVAC Installation
  • Safety Procedures

Professional Experience:

Worley Heating and Air
Harrisburg, PA | HVAC Technician | February 2017-Present

  • Inspected HVAC systems in residential homes
  • Ordered and replaced components as needed
  • Pitched systems to clients
  • Interpreted building blueprints for HVAC repair and installation

Hunt Corporation
Allentown, PA | HVAC Technician | January 2015 – December 2016

  • Assisted in HVAC system installs, including ductwork
  • Evaluated existing systems within commercial buildings
  • Repaired and monitored electrical controls, both pneumatic and digital
  • Diagnosed systems problems and presented solutions
  • Worked with business owners in choosing HVAC systems

Bradley HVAC
Harrisburg, PA | HVAC Technician Assistant | June 2012-December 2014

  • Organized components for installation
  • Processed parts orders
  • Checked system functionality on-site
  • Followed proper HVAC safety procedures
  • Performed preventative maintenance on system components

Education/Certifications

Associate Degree in HVAC
New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn, NY,
Class of 2012

HVAC Certification
Penn Foster Career School, Scranton, PA,
2011

Formatting

As an HVAC Technician, you understand the importance of fitting components together to form a functioning system. A resume is no different. It is made up of different parts that work together to achieve a desired end.

You desire a position in HVAC.

Your HVAC resume needs to help you accomplish that end.

The process begins with formatting.

These days, a resume has the attention of a hiring manager for an average of 6 seconds. In this short span of time, your resume will need to make an impression so that it is returned to later.

Add to that the reality that many employers now use Applicant Tracking Systems to scan resumes for keywords and language and the fact is the fate of your resume may very well be decided by software bots.

Don’t be discouraged though, we are here to help you create the best HVAC resume possible.

Start by structuring your resume in reverse chronological order.

List your most recent position/ job first, then work backwards from there.

Before you start writing, make sure to select a sensible font, nothing artistic or flowery. Keep it simple and professional.

Keep in mind your spacing as well, particularly with columns and bullet lists. Proper use of white spaces will make your resume scannable and also pleasing to the eye.

Your Summary

A summary is the first section of your HVAC resume. It is the first thing a hiring manager will look at. So you want to make a great impression with it.

The summary needs to give a rundown of the highlights of your experience in a span of 2-3 sentences.

Not too wordy, but precise and detailed.

The summary is your custom made elevator pitch.

In your summary, you need to demonstrate that you are skilled in the essential areas– that you are exactly what they’re looking for.

PRO TIP: A resume summary is all about communicating your value right off the bat. Don’t hesitate to make yourself shine a bit. Really pinpoint your strong skills and experience points.

Yes!

Versatile HVAC Technician with experience installing systems in a variety of structures including private homes and commercial buildings. Demonstrable history of accurately inspecting, replacing, and cleaning system components in addition to advanced knowledge of electrical controls. Skilled at blueprint evaluation and presenting HVAC system plans to clients.

No!

HVAC Technician with experience installing systems. I inspect, replace, and clean systems. I am skilled at reading blueprints and presenting plans to clients.

The examples are obviously different, but what makes the first superior to the second?

The first is a complete overview of your strongest skills. Though detailed, it is short and sweet. After a quick read through, a hiring manager will have a good idea of your skill level and will be ready to see more.

Power words are used to convey action. An employer wants to know that you will take the initiative and get things done. The first example uses power words in an effective way.

The second example is too general and lacks precision. It gives no sense of what you are truly capable of as an HVAC Technician. While the example contains power words, they are not supported by the surrounding language.

Note also the use of first-person, which is never acceptable on a resume.

Write an impactful summary and your chances of getting the job will greatly increase.

Expertise and Accomplishments

While your summary is important, it is also a block of text. You need a section that highlights your specific skills in the form of bullet points.

Now is a chance to list your Key Accomplishments or Areas of Expertise. These are the things most likely to set you apart from other candidates. Perhaps you have knowledge in a specified area that others do not, for instance.

Take advantage of that!

Example:

  • Blueprint Interpretation
  • Efficiency
  • Pneumatic Controls
  • Troubleshooting
  • System Diagnosis
  • HVAC Repair
  • HVAC Installation
  • Safety Procedures

Your bulleted list needs to be a combination of both Hard and Soft Skills.

Hard skills are those skills that are learned. Just what do you know about HVAC? What areas do you have the most technical knowledge of in your profession? Things like reading blueprints and HVAC installation are considered hard skills.

Soft skills are related to who you are on the job, your personality and temperament for instance.

Are you a leader?

Do you communicate well?

Your Areas of Expertise column should really stand out to the potential employer. You want the skills listed to be highly relevant to what they’re looking for.

PRO TIP: Think over the roles you played in past jobs. Not only the technical skills and tasks relevant to your profession but also your social standing among coworkers and team members. What did they have to say about you? Doing this will help you pinpoint both your hard and soft skill set.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Your Work Experience

Now that your points of expertise have been demonstrated, it is time to focus on your actual work history.

It is a snapshot of where you’ve been and where you’re going, and typically it will comprise the largest portion of your HVAC resume.

Layout is the first thing to grasp.

Reverse chronological order is the way to go. The first entry in your work history section should list your most recent job/position. This way the hiring manager will get an immediate sense of just what you’ve been up to lately.

Now go backward in time with the rest of your list.

It is of course ideal to include only those jobs relevant to the field you’re pursuing. However, it may be necessary to fill out your HVAC resume with unrelated jobs.

Don’t sweat it. You’re on a journey. Let them know where you’ve been.

Perhaps you’ve only just graduated from college or a training program.

Perhaps you’re changing careers.

Whatever it is, be upfront about it.

As you begin your work history section, be sure to include:

  • The company/employer name
  • Where the company/employer is located
  • What job you performed there

It is a common practice to include dates of employment on your HVAC resume. However, you may choose to leave dates out of your work experience.

Perhaps you’re nervous about short spans of employment, or maybe significant gaps between jobs.

If you do choose to leave dates off your resume, keep in mind that you will probably be asked about it during an interview. So be ready to give answers.

Now let’s move on to the day to day aspects of your former employment.

List your roles in a bullet list of 3-5 salient points. Remember to use power words that paint an impression of action and ability.

You want to demonstrate the value you held in previous positions.

As with your summary, be sure to use power words that emanate action and demonstrable ability.

See the examples below:

Yes!

Hunt Corporation | Allentown, PA | HVAC Technician | January 2015 – December 2016

  • Assisted in HVAC system installs, including ductwork
  • Evaluated existing systems within commercial buildings
  • Repaired and monitored electrical controls, both pneumatic and digital
  • Diagnosed systems problems and presented solutions
  • Worked with business owners in choosing HVAC systems

No!

Hunt Corporation | Allentown, PA | HVAC

  • Assisted in installs
  • Looked at existing systems
  • Repaired electrical controls
  • Saw problems and presented solutions
  • Worked with business owners

If you were a hiring manager at an HVAC company, which example would look the most attractive to you?

What does each tell you about the applicant?

The first example is a neat and tidy list of 5 points, each beginning with a strong power word.

A hiring manager can look at this list and gain detailed insight into what roles the applicant fulfilled at his previous job.

The second list doesn’t convey much about the applicant. It’s general, not specific, with ineffective power words.

There’s no sense of the applicant’s responsibilities or specific tasks.

The first example is clearly preferable. You want to give a potential employer an accurate grasp of your work experience.

PRO TIP: When considering power word choice, check the job description. You’ll probably find some great options, and they’ll be highly relevant to the specific position.

Bots

For those employers using an Applicant Tracking System (ATS), a resume has to get past scan bots before it comes to the hiring manager.

As you’re creating your HVAC resume, it is your job to help this happen.

One method is to use a paragraph format for your work experience section.

So from this:

Hunt Corporation | Allentown, PA | HVAC Technician | January 2015 – December 2016

  • Assisted in HVAC system installs, including ductwork
  • Evaluated existing systems within commercial buildings
  • Repaired and monitored electrical controls, both pneumatic and digital
  • Diagnosed systems problems and presented solutions
  • Worked with business owners in choosing HVAC systems

To this:

Assisted in HVAC system installs, including ductwork, and evaluated existing systems within commercial buildings. Repaired and monitored electrical controls, both pneumatic and digital. Diagnosed system problems and presented solutions, and also worked with business owners in choosing HVAC systems.

If there are elements of your experience you wish to highlight, you might consider a hybrid format:

Assisted in HVAC system installs, including ductwork, and evaluated existing systems within commercial buildings. Repaired and monitored electrical controls, both pneumatic and digital.

  • Diagnosed system problems and presented solutions
  • Worked with business owners in choosing HVAC systems

The paragraph format allows you to include more keywords to satisfy an ATS.

However, a paragraph is harder to read than a bulleted list. So while a paragraph format may please an ATS, it could do the opposite for an all-too-human hiring manager.

Sticking with 3-5 bullet points is the preferable option for readability for a hiring manager.

Listing Your Education Credentials

We’re approaching the end of your HVAC resume, and it is now time to write down your education details.

Do you have a degree in a specific technical field?

How about a liberal arts degree?

Have you graduated from a program?

Do you have a Bachelors Degree or a Masters Degree?

Highschool Diploma?

List all that apply, starting with your highest level of education. Write the institution and your date of graduation.

Example:

Associate Degree in HVAC
New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn, NY,
Class of 2012

If you are a recent grad, consider adding your GPA to boost your educational profile. Also note any special academic achievements.

If you’ve acquired any certificates or licenses, include them as well.

Example

HVAC Certification
Penn Foster Career School, Scranton, PA,
2011

Additional Resume Sections

In some cases, you’ll need to add additional sections to your HVAC resume. Perhaps there are items in your work experience that you want to highlight specifically, but they don’t really fit in the other sections.

You may also be in the position of needing extra sections to fill out your resume.
Below are a few entries you might add:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

Perhaps you have high hopes but little actual work experience.

Everyone is different. So learn to embrace your situation and work with it. The essentials of good resume writing still apply.

Write a great summary to start things off.

Then consider putting your education section next. It is going to be one of your chief assets.

When listing the work experience you do have, be sure to highlight aspects most closely aligned to the position you’re seeking.

Maybe you’ve worked with electronics.

Perhaps you’ve done construction work.

Both could be relevant. Think big and really consider what you have to bring to the table.

Guaranteed some of it will count as valuable experience.

Remember

A few tips to remember as we wrap things up:

Always include a way to be contacted on your HVAC resume

An email address, a Linkedin profile, a street address, etc. Just make sure they have a clear way to contact you.

Space is important

You only have one page, so use it wisely. Make sure to clearly demonstrate your talents and expertise in your summary at the top of the page, followed by your areas of expertise, your work experience, and then your education details.

Power words are crucial

Proper use of power words can really add value to your resume. They convey skill and initiative, so don’t miss out by not including them!

A proofreader is valuable

No matter how careful you are in writing your resume, some details can still slip by you. A proofreader will help alleviate the risk of typos and errors in grammar slipping through to the final product.

“Don’ts”

Be sure to avoid the following when creating your resume:

No first-person language

The use of “I” or “me” is not considered acceptable on a resume. Keep things sharp and to the point. A resume is not a personal letter, but a list of your professional experience and accomplishments.

Exceeding one page

Unless you’re outside the norm, you will not need more than one page to list your skills and experience. A single page is easy to handle and easy to scan.

No repetition

Repeating yourself is never a good thing. Keep it varied and be sure to use lots of effective power words.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Some Useful Tools

HVAC Resume Power Words

  • Inspected
  • Ordered
  • Pitched
  • Interpreted
  • Assisted
  • Evaluated
  • Repaired
  • Diagnosed
  • Worked
  • Organized
  • Processed
  • Checked
  • Followed
  • Performed

HVAC Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
Blueprint InterpretationEfficiency
Pneumatic ControlsTroubleshooting
HVAC RepairObservation
HVAC InstallationDetail Oriented
System DiagnosticCommunication