Resume Template: Network Administrator

by | Resume Templates, Resume Templates: Information Technology

The digital world is a complicated one, partly consisting of a vast web of network connections and internet technology.

Enter the Network Administrator!

You’ll be charged with overseeing network infrastructure for companies and businesses, and implementing adjustments as you see fit.

Troubleshooting and communication will be key skills.

So if you’re equal to the task, it’s time to start hunting down your dream job!

But you’ll need something first: a fantastic network administrator resume that demonstrates your expertise and experience.

We’re going to help you write the perfect resume for your skills and situation by outlining the essentials.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample network administrator resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best network administrator resume you possibly can.

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Network Administrator Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Bob Gaskins
bobgaskins@email.com
1 (937) 125-6574
Cincinnati, OH 41073

Summary Statement:

Network Administrator: Reliable Network Administrator experienced in network infrastructure operations, fiber-optic based network connections, VMWare, and other virtual environments. Skilled at implementing and troubleshooting routing protocols and known for quick problem-solving and multi-tasking abilities.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • System/Software Management
  • MS Office
  • Routing and Switching
  • Network Oversight/Maintenance
  • Project Management
  • Critical Thinking
  • Customer Service
  • Analysis
  • Detail Oriented
  • Efficient

Professional Experience:

JM Corporation | Cincinnati, OH
Network Administrator | November 2016 – Present

  • Keep network schematic and diagrams up to date
  • Manage the virtual network and user directory
  • Assist in creating a business continuity plan
  • Work with fiber-optic based network connections
  • Address problems with network and make necessary repairs to data, voice, and hardware/software

Farmer’s Credit Union | Cincinnati, OH
Network Administrator | June 2014 – September 2016

  • Provided support for local area and wide area network hardware/software
  • Ran backup procedures in order to maintain security of company infrastructure
  • Responded to user problems with system integration, software applications, and hardware
  • Analyzed changes in new hardware and software to assure compatibility with company system
  • Implemented training and technical support for all programs and company hardware

Hearst Consulting | Cincinnati, OH
Network Administrator | August 2011 – May 2014

  • Monitored and maintained network, including LAN, WAN, wireless, hubs and routers
  • Added and removed users from authorized user list
  • Archived files and provided oversight of password protection and security measures
  • Integrated network management applications for Internet components

Education/Certifications

Associate’s Degree in Network Administration

The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH,
Class of 2011

Formatting

Any online network functions according to set rules and parameters.

So it is with the formatting and layout of a network administrator resume.

In this day and age, a large number of companies have implemented a rigorous hiring process involving software bots that scan resume submissions for keywords and language.

So part of your goal should be to create a resume that is scannable.

But one that is also readable.

When a hiring manager gets your resume, he or she will look over it for a mere 6 seconds.

This is why formatting is so important!

It’s good practice to layout your resume in reverse chronological order, assuring that your most recent skills and experience are seen first.

Pay attention to font selection as well. A fancy or outlandish font will be distracting to the reader.

Which you do not want.

Also watch your white spaces. Meaning that your columns and text should be well-spaced and balanced with the blank sections of white page.

Your resume should look well-ordered and clean.

The Resume Summary

A resume summary is an opening statement of sorts.

It is your first opportunity to introduce your skills and qualifications.

The summary should go right at the top of the page. It should be a short paragraph of 2-3 sentences.

Sum up who you are and show how you’re the best candidate for the job by summarizing your skills.

Though a few sentences is not much, avoid being overly general in your descriptions. Get specific about your key areas of expertise.

An effective and well-written summary is an important step in setting the tone for the rest of your network administrator resume, not just for the reader, but for you as the writer.

So take your time!

PRO TIP: A resume summary should not be a statement of objective, rather a curated collection of your top skills. Think of it as an ad in the classifieds offering your services for hire.

To help you get your summary perfect, let’s work through some examples.

Yes!

Reliable Network Administrator experienced in network infrastructure operations, fiber-optic based network connections, VMWare, and other virtual environments. Skilled at implementing and troubleshooting routing protocols and known for quick problem-solving and multitasking abilities.

No!

Network guy good with various systems. Can find problems and make your networking better. Looking for a position with flexible hours where I can express myself openly.

The first example displays a solid professional with several key skill areas.

The reader is able to quickly gain an idea of the candidate’s value and what they stand to bring to the table should they be hired.

Power words are used in the summary to convey action and ability, which is important when communicating your skillset.

The second example is too brief and general in its language.

It also adds an objective to an ineffective summary of skills.

Remember that your summary needs to present a snapshot of who you are as a network administrator – the details of what it is you do.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments Section

The perfect way to punctuate your summary is to list your skills: your Key Accomplishments or Areas of Expertise.

Doing this will drive the point home, hopefully convincing the reader of your professional value.

Use bullet points to lay out your skills.

Example:

  • System/Software Management
  • MS Office
  • Routing and Switching
  • Network Oversight/Maintenance
  • Project Management
  • Critical Thinking
  • Customer Service
  • Analysis

Include both Hard skills and Soft skills on your list.

What’s the difference?

Hard skills are talents you’ve learned concerning your field, your areas of expertise, the skills that make you excel at what you do.

Soft skills involve those areas of personal skill, things like critical thinking, leadership qualities, and ability to communicate.

Get both types of skills down in a balanced list.

PRO TIP: Your skills are what set you apart from a world of other candidates, so don’t take the easy way out and simply repeat what you think are desirable skills. Rather, really try and pinpoint what you are capable of and highlight it!

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

The Work Experience Section

Your work experience section will probably be the focal point of your network administrator resume.

If you’ve had more than a few jobs, it will also be the longest.

Your work history reveals where you are going in your career and where you’ve been, two aspects that are very important to a potential employer.

You need to be clear and concise in this section. With each entry, you’ll need to encapsulate your time in the position and your main roles there.

Begin with layout.

Remember our mention of reverse chronological order?

That’s what you’ll be using when it comes to the layout of your work experience section.

Your first entry will be your most recent job position.

After that you’ll work backwards in time to your first relevant job.

Relevant is the key word here.

You will not need to list every job you’ve ever held.

With this layout, you’ll begin by writing about your most recent role first and work backwards.

In the heading for each position, be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

It is prudent to include the dates you were at the position, meaning the month and year you started and the month and year you left.

There are several reasons why you may not want to include dates on your network administrator resume. Perhaps you only held a job for a short period or went for long periods of time between jobs.

It is true that these types of things do not look great on a resume.

But bear in mind that should you leave dates off your resume and make it to the interview phase, you will most certainly be asked about missing dates and gaps. So have answers prepared!

After writing out your heading for the position, use 3-5 bullet points to list the day to day particulars of the job.

What were your key areas of responsibility?

How did you go about your work?

Did you earn any awards or produce notable changes in your work environment?

Use power words in your descriptions to give them a feeling of action and confidence.

Here are a few examples:

Yes!

JM Corporation | Cincinnati, OH | Network Administrator | November 2016 – Present

  • Keep network schematic and diagrams up to date
  • Manage the virtual network and user directory
  • Assist in creating a business continuity plan
  • Work with fiber-optic based network connections
  • Address problems with network and make necessary repairs to data, voice, & hardware/software

No!

JM Corporation | Network Administrator

  • Make sure everything is updated
  • Watch network as administrator
  • I make network connections
  • Work on problems having to do with network

Why is the first example superior?

It is a good breakdown of the candidate’s time in the position. The reader is given plenty of detail to form an impression of competency and skill level.

The author gets specific about duties performed on the job.

Relevant power words add strength to the language of the bullet points.

The second example is poor and lacks sufficient detail about the candidate’s function in the position.

Vague outlines are provided about the day-to-day roles, but nothing specific to demonstrate value or ability.

That’s not what you want!

Your bullet points should convey your strengths as a candidate. Don’t sell yourself short.

PRO TIP: When brainstorming power words to use, the job description is your best friend. It often lists the specific experience that is wanted, so it’s an awesome blueprint for choosing keywords.

About Bots

We’ve talked about scanning bots – how employers use them to evaluate resumes.

Bots function within an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). These systems are used to test the suitability of any given resume.

If you are concerned about a particular ATS, consider changing the formatting of your work experience section.

Use a paragraph instead of bullet points for your position entries.

So instead of looking like this:

JM Corporation | Cincinnati, OH | Network Administrator | November 2016 – Present

  • Keep network schematic and diagrams up to date
  • Manage the virtual network and user directory
  • Assist in creating a business continuity plan
  • Work with fiber-optic based network connections
  • Address problems with network and make necessary repairs to data, voice, and hardware/software

Paragraph format would look like this:

Keep network schematic and diagrams up to date. Manage the virtual network and user directory on a constant basis. Assist in creating a business continuity plan and risk assessment. Work with fiber-optic based network connections.

Using a mixed format is also an option. Employ several bullet points in order to highlight roles of note:

Keep network schematic and diagrams up to date. Manage the virtual network and user directory on a constant basis. Assist in creating a business continuity plan and risk assessment. Work with fiber-optic based network connections.

  • Address problems with network and make necessary repairs to data, voice, and hardware/software
  • Received special award for excellence in administration

While a paragraph allows you to add more keywords, thus pleasing the bots, they also create more text on the page.

Not so good for the human reader!

So you will be taking a risk should you choose an alternative format.

The Education Section

So let’s talk about education.

How did your time at college or school prepare you for your role as a network administrator?

What degree(s) have you received?

What areas did you study?

You will answer these questions in this section.

But first, start by listing the highest level of education you received.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

Now list the name of the institution(s) you attended and what you studied there.

List any degree(s) earned.

Also consider adding special accomplishments like making the Dean’s List, concentrations, and even your GPA.

Example:

Associate’s Degree in Network Administration
The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH,
GPA: 3.4
Class of 2011

It’s also a good idea to include ways in which you’ve grown your expertise after graduating.

Example:

  • “Network Admin 2013,” Professional Workshop, Dallas, TX

Additional Sections

Do you have any special accomplishments unrelated to network administration?

You can include them in an additional section!

This can be especially helpful if you lack much experience in your chosen field.

Consider adding sections such as:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

We’ve all been there.

You’ve just graduated, but you have little to no actual experience under your belt.

But you still need an effective networking administrator resume.

No fears!

Let’s just make a few changes and talk about focus.

First, you should move your education section. Place it under your summary near the top of the page.

Your education is going to help you convey value if you lack experience.

So those details need to be seen by the reader as quickly as possible.

Now let’s consider your work experience section.

You’ve obviously held a job (or jobs), although not in your new vocation.

However, you’ve probably accumulated skills during your various job positions that could prove useful to you now – so let’s focus on those and highlight them in your work history.

For instance, maybe you’re familiar with customer service or working with clients?

Perhaps you’ve held a job that required troubleshooting and details?

How about planning and resource management?

Experience like this could certainly prove relevant to you on your new career path!

Employers will take notice of these areas.

Tips to Remember

First off, list your contact info somewhere on the page (typically at the top) – don’t forget!

Proper use of space

You have limited space to demonstrate your value as a candidate, so use it well. Start with your summary, followed by your work experience, then education details. This will assure that your space is being well utilized.

Use relevant power words

Power words are great, but choose the right words and keep them relevant. Check the job description for good power word ideas.

Use a proofreader

Your network administrator resume will need to be looked over by someone other than you. It’s just prudent and a good practice for any writer.

Mistakes to Avoid

Avoid first person language

Don’t refer to yourself directly in your resume. It takes focus off your skills. Your resume is not a personal letter but a statement of your experience directly related to network administration.

Avoid going over one page

Your skills and accomplishments should fit nicely onto a single page. There is no need to go over unless you are exceptionally talented or are seeking a very high position.

Avoid repetition

Repetition in most things is never a good idea, and certainly not in your resume. Make an effort to keep your language fresh and varied. Power words help with this!

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Avoid odd fonts and formatting

Remember that readability is a central priority in your writing. This applies to font and formatting as well. Choose sensible/professional options for both.

Some Helpful Tools:

Power Words

  • Kept
  • Managed
  • Assisted
  • Worked
  • Addressed
  • Provided
  • Ran
  • Responded
  • Analyzed
  • Implemented
  • Monitored
  • Added
  • Archived
  • Integrated

Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
System/Software Management Critical Thinking
MS Office Customer Service
Routing/Switching Analysis
Network Oversight Detail Oriented
Project Management Efficient