Resume Template: Paramedic/EMT

by | Resume Templates, Resume Templates: Healthcare

As an EMT or Paramedic, you are always ready to answer the call.

You have set out to help others in their most drastic times of need.

Working on the front lines of the medical field, you’re going to see things that even doctors and surgeons won’t.

It’s no shock that the job of an EMT or a paramedic can be chaotic and unpredictable.

While there might be downtime while you are on-call, you are typically busy filling out paperwork, restocking the truck, or possibly studying.

This job requires knowledge, experience, and a strong ability to emotionally cope with anything and everything emergency situations can throw at you.

During all of this, writing the perfect Paramedic/EMT resume is likely something you haven’t had enough time or energy to devote yourself to.

Whether or not you are just starting out or you are looking into switching hospitals or companies, we have everything you need to get started.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample Paramedic/EMT resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best Paramedic/EMT resume you possibly can.

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Paramedic/EMT Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Andrew Chen
andrewchen@gmail.com
1 (281) 475-8632
Houston, TX 77037

Summary Statement:

Paramedic/EMT: Highly skilled Paramedic with history of operating in high-stress and emergency situations. Adept in performing all emergency medical procedures, including advanced resuscitation and life support methods in addition to administering crucially quick and accurate assessments and diagnosis. Possesses confidence on the job and compassion towards every patient.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • EKG
  • Medications
  • CPR
  • Ambulance Inventory
  • Vehicle Safety
  • Quick Thinking
  • Focus
  • Teamwork
  • Compassion
  • Intubation and Transfusion
  • Emergency Vehicle Operation
  • Leadership

Professional Experience:

South Houston Hospital, Houston, TX
Paramedic | July 2017 – Present

  • Provide pre-hospital care to over 200 patients, including advanced life support
  • Take statements from witnesses and filed the proper documentation for accident/incident reports
  • Manage inventory and maintained emergency vehicle without incident
  • Implemented at-the-scene care according to injury severity while managing a team of 2-3 EMTs
  • Administer necessary medications via IV injections or infusions

Southside Ambulance Service, Houston, TX
Paramedic | January 2015 – May 2017

  • Managed ambulance inventory, restocked supplies, assisted with clean up when needed
  • Delegated tasks to EMTs during emergency situations while maintaining a confident demeanor
  • Prepared patient care reports after transfers
  • Strictly adhered to all company guidelines, safety measures, and HIPPA
  • Performed emergency medical care using defibrillators, EKG monitors, oxygen and suction devices

Harris County Rescue, Houston, TX
June 2012 – December 2014

  • Assessed injuries on scene and transferred patients to ambulance
  • Maintained clean and sanitized ambulance treatment areas
  • Assisted paramedics in resuscitation and life support procedures
  • Informed hospital en route concerning number and status of patients being transferred
  • Drove ambulance when required
  • Applied CPR to patients in emergency situations

Education/Certifications

Paramedic Certification
Dallas County Community College, Dallas, TX,
2013

EMT Certification
Elite EMT Academy, Dallas, TX,
2011

Formatting Your Paramedic/EMT Resume

When you arrive on the scene, before you can start tending to people in need, the first thing you need to do is assess the situation.

Before a hiring manager starts reading a resume, they often notice the layout first and assess its aesthetics.

Hiring managers are drawn to resumes that appear professional yet easy to read, so your job is to figure out how to create that appearance.

While there are many different acceptable resume formats to choose from, there are a few details that, if followed correctly, should create an impressive paramedic/EMT resume.

Listing accomplishments and work history in reverse chronological order is an expected structure that allows hiring managers to know right away what you have been working on most recently.

Pay attention to the spacing between lines and sections; the separation between words is what guides your reader’s eyes down the page.

Utilizing bullet points, bolding, or italicizing to split up thoughts and details also helps separate important information so that it can stand out.

While it might sound like an obvious decision, it is necessary to mention that while you can choose from many different fonts, always make sure you select a font that is legible and easy to read.

When hiring managers only spend around 6 seconds reviewing individual resumes, your main goal should always be to create a resume that doesn’t appear complicated and draws attention to the details you think are the most important.

Start With Your Resume Summary

Now that you understand the basics concerning the overall appearance of your paramedic/EMT resume, it’s time to jump into the first section.

A resume summary is not a summary of what you will be going over in your resume necessarily, but more a summary of yourself as an EMT/Paramedic.

The best way to begin your resume summary is to start by asking yourself a few questions.

What does an EMT/paramedic do, and what are their responsibilities?

What are the most significant characteristics of a great EMT/Paramedic?

How do I carry out my responsibilities as an EMT/Paramedic, and what significant qualities do I have related to this field?

Once you have answered these questions, you can begin to build a brief summary (two to three sentences) about yourself as an EMT/Paramedic.

Yes!

Highly skilled Paramedic with a history of operating in high-stress and emergency situations. Adept in performing all emergency medical procedures, including advanced resuscitation and life support methods, in addition to administering crucially quick and accurate assessments and diagnosis. Possesses confidence and urgency on the job with deep compassion towards every patient.

No!

A paramedic who is good with high-stress and emergency situations. Can perform all emergency medical procedures. Always confident on the job and caring towards patients.

The first example describes the candidate using semi-specific details to back up their claims, along with varied speech to highlight their multitude of skills.

The second example lends little to no detail and employs unimpactful language that fails to describe a desirable candidate.

PRO TIP: While the resume summary is the first section of most resumes, it is often a tricky section to write. If you are struggling to come up with what to say, or how to narrow attributes down, try skipping this section and coming back to it. Once you have written your work experience and education, you may find that you are more capable of tackling a summary regarding who you are as a paramedic.

Key Accomplishments/ Skills & Qualifications

Often an important section to include on your paramedic/EMT resume is a minimalistic list of your skills and qualifications related to your field.

This list should appear straightforward and to the point by listing each skill in its own bullet point.

The skills included in this list should range from both hard to soft skills.

Hard skills – often referred to as technical skills, they need to be taught and practiced in order to be achieved.

Soft skills – referred to as people skills, they are more subjective and are often regarded as personality traits.

While working in the medical field, hard skills are often what people think of when they begin to write this list.

You want to include things like intubation and transfusion or operating an emergency vehicle to cover your hard skills; however, soft skills are still critical.

Being an EMT or a paramedic requires you to comfort patients and work well with other medical staff – being compassionate and effective at communication are crucial soft skills for this field.

Let’s take a look at an example.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • EKG
  • Medications
  • CPR
  • Ambulance Inventory
  • Vehicle Safety
  • Quick Thinking
  • Focus
  • Teamwork
  • Compassion
  • Intubation and Transfusion
  • Emergency Vehicle Operation

PRO TIP: While it is important to be honest about what skills you possess, always look at the job posting you are responding to. Often, job posts will include details describing their ideal candidate – make sure that if you have skills that they cover that you add them to your own resume. Hiring managers want to know right away if you are a compatible candidate.

Writing Your Work Experience

The section that commonly takes up the most space on a resume is work experience.

As we previously mentioned, this section should be written in reverse chronological order so that your most recent and impressive work comes first.

Make sure that you are only including jobs that are related to being an EMT or Paramedic or at least the medical field in general.

Once you have decided what jobs to include in this section, you will need to describe each position in three to five bullet points.

Make sure that each bullet point you write covers a separate job task so that the versatility of your abilities comes through.

While this section does describe the jobs you have worked, the main goal is to promote yourself and show off your practiced strengths.

It is a good idea to describe job tasks that will relate best to the job you are applying to.

Yes!

South Houston Hospital | Houston, TX | Paramedic | July 2017 – Present

  • Provide pre-hospital care to over 200 patients, including advanced life support
  • Take statements from witnesses and file the proper documentation for accident/incident reports
  • Manage inventory and maintain emergency vehicle without incident
  • Implement at-the-scene care according to injury severity while managing a team of 2-3 EMTs
  • Administer necessary medications via IV injections or infusions

No!

South Houston Hospital | Houston, TX | Paramedic | July 2017 – Present

  • Lend pre-hospital care to patients
  • Work closely with EMTs
  • Care for patients during transport to a hospital
  • Take care of patients at the scene
  • Administer necessary medications

The first example lends specific details and includes impactful power words (action verbs) to start each bullet point.

The second example uses weak and undescriptive bullet points that don’t fully explain each task and leaves many details to the imagination.

PRO TIP: Quantifying and qualifying details in each bullet point allows your reader to understand each job task and what it entails more fully. If you have overseen a team of EMTs, then say how many people that team consisted of. If you are discussing providing medical care to a patient in transit, include details about what procedures you conducted.

(If you lack work experience, see below for a helpful section.)

About Bots

Many companies don’t have the amount of time necessary to review every resume they receive.

Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), or bots, are computer programs designed to evaluate resumes and sort them before a hiring manager takes a look.

It is essential to know that bots search resumes for specific keywords in order to decipher what resumes will “make the cut.”

Due to the increased use of bots, some resume experts believe that writing your job descriptions in paragraphs, instead of bullet points, can allow candidates to insert more keywords into their resumes.

However, here at Big Interview, we believe that sticking with bullet points is still the best option.

When using bullet points, it is possible to be concise with your wording while still including an adequate number of keywords to catch the attention of a bot.

Once your paramedic/EMT resume is flagged by a bot it will be reviewed by someone in charge of hiring.

Bullet points create a professional appearance that is easy to follow and comprehend for human viewers.

Let’s look at the visual differences between these resume formats.

Standard bullet point format:

Southside Ambulance Service | Houston, TX | Paramedic | January 2015 – May 2017

  • Managed ambulance inventory, restocked supplies, assisted with clean up when needed
  • Delegated tasks to EMTs during emergency situations while maintaining a confident demeanor 
  • Prepared patient care reports after transfers
  • Strictly adhered to all company guidelines, safety measures, and HIPPA
  • Performed emergency medical care using defibrillators, EKG monitors, oxygen and suction devices

Paragraph format:

Southside Ambulance Service | Houston, TX | Paramedic | January 2015 – May 2017
Managed ambulance inventory, restocked supplies, assisted with clean up when needed. Delegated tasks to EMTs during emergency situations while maintaining a clear and confident demeanor for team and patients. Prepared patient care reports after transfers. Strictly adhered to all company guidelines, safety measures, and HIPPA. Performed emergency medical care using defibrillators, EKG monitors, oxygen and suction devices.

Paragraph format w/ bullet points:

Southside Ambulance Service | Houston, TX | Paramedic | January 2015 – May 2017
Managed ambulance inventory, restocked supplies, assisted with clean up when needed. Delegated tasks to EMTs during emergency situations while maintaining a clear and confident demeanor for team and patients. Prepared patient care reports after transfers. Strictly adhered to all company guidelines, safety measures, and HIPPA. Performed emergency medical care using defibrillators, EKG monitors, oxygen, and suction devices.

  • 75+ IFTs
  • Fluent Spanish speaker

Writing Your Education Section

Including an education section is required in most fields and particularly essential for medical occupations.

Be sure to include your highest degree of education, along with all relevant certifications and licenses.

When listing degrees of education, include the title of your degree, the school you attended, and the year of graduation.

Example:

Paramedic Certification
Dallas County Community College, Dallas, TX,
2013

EMT Certification
Elite EMT Academy, Dallas, TX,
2011

High School Diploma – Honors Graduate
Liberty High School
2010

Possible Sections to Include in Your Paramedic/EMT Resume

If you have more qualifications or achievements that you feel should be mentioned, it is acceptable to include additional sections.

Some additional sections to consider including are:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What If You Have No Experience?

If you are fresh out of school and have only received basic EMT training, it might feel overwhelming to try and land your first job.

The first step in obtaining a job is creating a great paramedic/EMT resume, but that might be more of a challenge when you don’t have any work history to speak of.

Creating a resume that suits your situation starts with moving your education section directly below your summary.

Giving your education section a more prime location allows it to stand out more – this is important when your education is more practical and impressive than your job history.

Try to expand on your education section to include any additional impressive details.

High GPAs, honors, awards, and specific coursework related to medical care can help bolster your education section.

If you have additional experience in the form of volunteer work or internships, those details will go a long way in landing you your first paid opportunity.

The most important key to getting your first job is staying positive and confident – a good attitude and strong personality can go a long way in impressing a hiring manager.

Paramedic/EMT Resume Points to Remember

The basics

Always double-check that you have included your name and contact information in a clearly visible location on your paramedic/EMT resume. It is easy to get caught up in the more complicated aspects of resume writing, but don’t let that distract you from the simple stuff.

Versatility is key

Start each bullet point with a new power word (action verb) or keyword to describe yourself and the experience you have. Never reuse the same power word.

Check things over

Never assume that what you have written is good to go without a full check-up. Revise and review your resume with care and intention to improve on your first draft. If you have a friend who can look it over with you, utilize the opportunity.

Try to Avoid

It’s not just about you

Even a great resume can get passed up if the candidate doesn’t seem compatible with the company. Make sure that you are looking through the job posting or reading up on the company or hospital you are applying to, to tailor your resume to their preferences.

Write your Paramedic/EMT resume to the point

The goal of a resume is to inform a hiring manager of your strengths and abilities in regards to the job you seek. Don’t get caught up in trying to create an overly unique format or “fun” font to catch their attention. Keep things straightforward and professional, and let the information speak for itself.

Two-page resumes

Finding the time to review resumes isn’t an easy task for companies. Narrow things down so that all of your information fits comfortably on one-page. Never hand in a two-page resume.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested power words.)

Helpful Tools

Paramedic/EMT Power Words

  • Administered
  • Founded
  • Adept
  • Formulated
  • Built
  • Implemented
  • Created
  • Improved
  • Consolidated
  • Initiated
  • Coordinated
  • Launched
  • Developed
  • Pioneered
  • Designed
  • Organized

Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
HIPPA Quick Thinking
Ambulance Inventory Team-Oriented
EKG Compassion
Intubation and Transfusion Physical Stamina
Emergency Vehicle Operation Attention to Detail