Plumbing is one of those occupations that will always be in demand, and your plumber resume should demonstrate that you’re the person for the job. 

As long as people require running water and fixtures in their homes, businesses, buildings, and offices, plumbers will be needed to address everything from leaking pipes to clogged drains.

Plumbing is also a job that people prefer not to do themselves.

So that’s good news for you!

Not all plumbers possess the same skill level, however. There are good plumbers and bad plumbers.

Obviously, you want to be a good plumber.

So you’ll need to create a plumber resume that reflects your skill level and instills confidence in your potential employer or client.

The following article will go over the steps and tips you need to know to write a professional plumber’s resume.

Let’s get started. Your career is waiting!

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample plumber resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best plumber resume you possibly can.

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Plumber Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Chris Harper
chrisharper@gmail.com
(719) 447-0124
Colorado Springs, CO 80911
linkedin.com/chrisharper

Summary Statement:

Plumber: Licensed journeyman plumber with eight years’ experience in the field including a completed Apprenticeship to master plumber before setting up successful private business. Assisted in installation and repair on plumbing systems for commercial and industrial buildings and extensive experience in residential plumbing, involving use of cutting and grinding equipment, installation of hot and cold lines, parts orders, and job bidding.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Journeyman Status
  • Air and Water Systems
  • Cutting Torches
  • Organization
  • Time Management
  • PFI, ANSI, and ASME Codes
  • Marketing
  • Verbal Communication
  • Detail-oriented
  • Observation

Professional Experience:

Harper Plumbing
Colorado Springs, CO | Owner/Operator | October 2018–Present

  • Hired and managed employees
  • Successfully marketed business
  • Bid for residential plumbing contracts, both new and existing construction
  • Assisted in system installation as needed
  • Evaluated blueprints for system planning

James Plumbing Works
Castle Rock, CO | Apprentice Plumber | June 2014–June 2018

  • Compiled plumbing supplies and equipment for major jobs
  • Checked for leaks in existing systems
  • Adhered to all codes, regulations, and guidelines
  • Installed supply lines, drain lines, vent lines, and fixtures

Mountain View Plumbing
Colorado Springs, CO | Assistant Plumber | January 2012–May 2014

  • Routed PVC and CPVC plumbing lines
  • Measured pipe and selected proper fittings
  • Cut pipe to length using cutting torch and other equipment
  • Tested systems with compressed air
  • Purchased parts and components

Education/Certifications

Journeyman Plumber
Licensed by the State of Colorado
2018

Plumber Apprenticeship
J.A.T.C Apprentice Program, Colorado Springs, CO
2014–2018

Formatting

Every plumbing system is made up of essential connections and routes, otherwise it doesn’t work at all.

It’s the same with your plumber resume.

Proper formatting will make your resume functional as an accurate document of your skills and work history.

If you’re submitting your plumber resume to a potential employer who uses Applicant Tracking Software (ATS), correct formatting and language will help get it past scanning bots.

Hiring managers spend an average of six seconds looking at a resume.

Again, the right formatting, along with keywords and language, will ensure that your resume will make an impression.

So the overall goals with your resume are scanability and readability.

To achieve your goals, you need to start by structuring your resume in reverse chronological order.

Your most recent position will be listed first, followed by your second most recent, and so on.

Avoid choosing any odd or fancy fonts for your resume. Stick with a basic font that will get the job done and look professional.

Watch your white spaces as you build the different sections of your plumber resume. Proper use of spacing really lends itself to readability.

Writing Your Resume Summary

Your resume summary sets the stage.

It is your opening statement and must clearly communicate your value to the reader.

In 2–3 sentences, you’ll need to sum up what makes you unique as a plumber. What sets you apart?

We understand that a mere few sentences is not very much space to make an impression.

It’s possible though. You just need the right emphasis.

Your summary is all about honing in on your most relevant attributes related to your field.

PRO TIP: Your summary is not your work history, so be careful to not word it as such. Your summary should be a quick breakdown of your most relevant skills and current professional status.

Let’s look at some resume summary examples:

Yes!

Licensed journeyman plumber with eight years’ experience in the field including a completed Apprenticeship to master plumber before setting up a successful private business. Assisted in installation and repair on plumbing systems for commercial and industrial buildings and extensive experience in residential plumbing, involving the use of cutting and grinding equipment, installation of hot and cold lines, parts orders, and job bidding.

No!

Plumber with eight years experience in a private business. Did installation and repair on plumbing systems in different types of buildings. Have knowledge of plumbing equipment. Can make parts orders and bid on jobs.

Which example echoes a sense of confidence and communicates a comprehensive skill set?

Which is more likely to impress a hiring manager?

Let’s look at both examples and break them down.

In the first, we’re given an immediate impression of this plumber’s skill level. Not only is he licensed with eight years of experience — he is also apprenticed under a master plumber. The summary is impressive already.

Compare this with how the second example kicks off. All we get is that the applicant is a plumber with eight years of experience. Now that’s obviously better than nothing at all, but it’s lacking definition and raises more questions than it answers.

You need to be clear and concise when writing your qualifications. Don’t sell yourself short by leaving out relevant/important details.

Notice how the first example uses power words like “completed” and “assisted”? Power words communicate action and competence.

The second example lacks detail and is imprecise. The reader gains no sense of the applicant’s expertise.

Take your time when crafting the summary. Remember, it’s your opening statement, your elevator pitch, and first impression.

Expertise and Accomplishments

Unlike the summary, the second part of your plumber resume is not a block of text, but rather a bulleted list.

It will be a snapshot of your most relevant skills.

You want to list what you’re good at in your chosen field. Preferably, your skills will stand out from those of other applicants. Really pinpoint what skills and accomplishments make you unique and the superior option for an employer.

Example:

  • Journeyman Status
  • Air and Water Systems
  • Cutting Torches
  • Organization
  • Time Management
  • PFI, ANSI, and ASME Codes
  • Marketing
  • Verbal Communication
  • Detail-oriented
  • Observation

Don’t leave any relevant skills off your resume!

Think of your list in terms of hard skills and soft skills.

What is the difference?

Hard skills are knowledge directly related to your profession. So, in this case, your hard skills would be those areas of plumbing that you have expert knowledge of.

What professional skills make you a great plumber?

Soft skills represent those areas of your personality that come into play in your day-to-day work environment. Things like attitude and interpersonal skills.

What qualities make people want to work with you?

When you’re done assembling your skills list, look them over to check if they best represent your talents and value.

PRO TIP: Your areas of expertise and accomplishments are an important snapshot of your current skill set. If, for some reason, a potential employer overlooks your summary, they should be able to get a grasp of your value from your list. So take your time and really consider what your key skills are.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Your Work Experience

The summary was your first big step in writing a perfect plumber resume, but now it’s time to move on to the heart of the matter.

Your actual work experience.

Time to show off!

How is your career shaping up so far?

Are you going somewhere?

If the answer is “yes”, then you need to demonstrate it in your work history. It is the section that will take up the most space on your resume.

So let’s not waste it.

It starts with the layout.

Reverse chronological order is again the method of the day.

Begin with listing your most recent position and your day-to-day responsibilities in that position.

Don’t be concerned with making an entry for every job you’ve ever held. We are looking for relevant experience.

However, one exception would be if you lack work experience.

Be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

Include dates for each position unless you have a good reason not to, such as gaps in employment or a short term of employment.

You should keep in mind, though, that you will probably be asked about any gaps or short periods of employment during an interview process. So be prepared to answer those questions if you decide to leave dates off your plumber resume.

After listing the name of your former employer/company, location, and dates, it’s time to list your day-to-day functions using a bullet point format.

Remember to use power words!

Each work entry should be comprised of 3–5 bullet points, which is just enough to accurately convey what roles you assumed in your former positions.

Example:

Yes!

James Plumbing Works | Castle Rock, CO | Apprentice Plumber | June 2014–June 2018

  • Compiled plumbing supplies and equipment for major jobs
  • Observed job planning for commercial and industrial applications
  • Checked for leaks in existing systems
  • Adhered to all codes, regulations, and guidelines
  • Installed supply lines, drain lines, vent lines, and fixtures

No!

James Plumbing Works | Apprentice Plumber | June 2014–June 2018

  • Got supplies and equipment for jobs
  • Watched job planning
  • Looked for leaks
  • Followed codes
  • Installed plumbing

Which example is more effective?

The first is a list of points that provide a proper level of detail concerning day-to-day tasks on the job.

Not too general, not too detailed

Power words are used effectively, conveying action, and competence on the job.

The second example is lacking in specificity and does not utilize powerful words very effectively.

The location of the place of employment is also left out, an element that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Each work entry should encapsulate your time at the position. The reader should not be left wondering about what the points do not say.

PRO TIP: Power words are important, but use them wisely. Do not pair them with an inadequate qualifier.

Remember the Bots

An Applicant Tracking System (ATS) could potentially cause a hiccup in your plumber resume’s progress to a hiring manager’s desk.

Using a paragraph format for your work history is one way to help circumvent this potential difficulty.

So from this:

James Plumbing Works | Castle Rock, CO | Apprentice Plumber | June 2014–June 2018

  • Compiled plumbing supplies and equipment for major jobs
  • Observed job planning for commercial and industrial applications
  • Checked for leaks in existing systems
  • Adhered to all codes, regulations, and guidelines
  • Installed supply lines, drain lines, vent lines, and fixtures

To this:

Compiled plumbing supplies and equipment for major jobs. Observed job planning for commercial and industrial applications. Checked for leaks in existing systems and adhered to all codes, regulations and guidelines.

You could also use a combination format. Employ limited bullet points to emphasize certain achievements or roles:

Compiled plumbing supplies and equipment for major jobs. Observed job planning for commercial and industrial applications. Checked for leaks in existing systems and adhered to all codes, regulations and guidelines.

  • Installed supply lines, drain lines, vent lines, and fixtures

An ATS loves keywords, and the paragraph format can provide you with an opportunity to include more of them.

It is important to note that a paragraph format for your work history will make it more difficult to read.

There is a chance, of course, that a hiring manager will be suitably impressed with your preceding resume sections and, therefore, not mind taking the time to read through an alternate format.

It’s a gamble though, which is why we recommend the bullet point format.

Listing Your Education

The final section of your plumber resume will most likely be your education section.

What type of degree do you have and where did you receive it?

Have you had any higher education at all?

How about certifications or programs?

You will answer these questions in this section of your resume.

Start with your highest level of education or highest qualification. Then, work backward from there.

Example:

Journeyman Plumber
Licensed by the State of Colorado
2018

Plumber Apprenticeship
J.A.T.C Apprentice Program, Colorado Springs, CO
2014–2018

You can also list any special academic achievements.

If you are fresh out of school, you might also consider adding your GPA.

Possible sections

Some achievements might not fit with the typical sections of a resume. If this is the case for you, adding an extra section is entirely appropriate.

It might also be the case that you simply do not have much work experience and need to fill out your plumber resume with an additional section.

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

Not much of a work history to speak of?

Don’t fear — there are a few techniques you can use to help alleviate the deficit.

One formatting option would be to move your education section so that it follows your summary.

You’ll still want to write a strong summary, but directly following up with your education credentials will help raise your value right off the bat.

If you lack experience, your education is going to be one of your most valuable selling points.

Another technique is to mine what work history you do have for relevant points related to the new position you’re seeking.

What have you done that could help you achieve your goal?

Since you are seeking a career in plumbing, have you ever held a job in which you’ve been required to assess or repair something?

Have you had to be organized?

Have you worked with your hands?

Have you used tools?

Whatever is relevant, you should list in your work history bullet points.

Tips to Keep in Mind

Always include your contact information

They can’t get back to you if they don’t know how. Including your contact information seems like a no-brainer, but it’s one of those things that can be forgotten if you’re not careful.

List your LinkedIn profile, email address, or any other relevant contact info.

Get your spacing right

Spacing is important in your formatting. Place your summary at the top of the page, followed by your hard/soft skills list, then your work history and education.

Power words strengthen your writing

Power words give you an opportunity to really sell your resume for the reader. There are so many words to choose from. Find the words that work for you and plug them in.

Unleash a proofreader on your plumber resume

Typos and grammar mistakes follow even the best writers. We all need a proofreader, especially with something as important as a resume. Have someone look over your writing to give it the extra polish it needs to really stand out.

What Not To Do

A few things to keep in mind:

Be sure to avoid the following when creating your resume:

No first-person language

No “me” or “I” on your resume. It is easy to slip up and include first-person language because we use it so often when writing. However, it is inappropriate in a resume. You want to keep things focused, professional, and impersonal.

Keep it to one page

Your experience, skills, and accomplishments should all fit on one page. One page is easy to handle and can be read over quickly.

Watch for repetition

Repeating yourself will make your resume look amateur. So put in the effort to add variation and select effective power words.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Use basic fonts

Remember that readability is key. You don’t want to use a font that is difficult to read, even if it looks nice.

Some Tools

Plumber Resume Power Words

  • Hired
  • Bidded
  • Assisted
  • Evaluated
  • Compiled
  • Observed
  • Checked
  • Adhered
  • Installed
  • Routed
  • Measured
  • Cut
  • Tested
  • Purchased

Plumber Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
Journeyman StatusOrganization
Air and Water SystemsTime Management
Cutting TorchesVerbal Communication
PFI, ANSI, and ASME CodesDetail-oriented
MarketingObservation