Resume Template: Project Manager

by | Resume Templates, Resume Templates: Management

As a project manager, you are likely very familiar with the hiring process.

Whether you are applying to projects that are long-term or short-term, you are no stranger to keeping your eyes open for the next available opportunity.

While you might have an edge when it comes to promoting yourself for hire, you are always going up against other candidates who are just as well versed as you.

Throw in the fact that this line of work is becoming more and more saturated with new candidates coming in from all kinds of backgrounds – you will need an extra edge to stand out.

Getting noticed and landing a job all starts with writing the perfect project manager resume that captures your potential.

When it comes time to write a resume that is going to stand out among the rest, you are going to need to dig deep and write something that hits all the right points.

If you want to beat out the competition, it is important to brush up on your resume writing skills, including the most up to date industry standards.

If you’re ready to get started and land your next big role, you’ve come to the right place.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample project manager resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best project manager resume you possibly can.

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Project Manager Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Christopher Frost
CFrost@email.com
1 (410) 555-5500
Baltimore, MD 21201

Summary Statement:

Project Manager: Effective project manager with 10 years of experience in technology and construction industries and proven ability to communicate effectively with client and project team to efficiently ensure project meets objectives in a timely manner. Passion for finding strengths within a team and offering creative solutions to issues before they become problems.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Scheduling
  • PC Proficiency
  • Bluebeam
  • Motivation
  • Sharepoint
  • Asana
  • XLC
  • SOP
  • RFI
  • AutoCAD
  • Leadership
  • MS Office
  • Strategic Planning
  • Communication
  • Time Management

Professional Experience:

Radiant Infotech | Catonsville, MD
Project Manager | Sept 2016 – Present

  • Meet with end-users to identify gaps and document requirements to improve customer satisfaction 
  • Prepare agendas and meetings with a project team of 20 people to ensure accomplishment of goals
  • Develop status reports identifying issues, risks, and plans, reducing annual costs by nearly 15%
  • Review requirements and monitor implementation to ensure business needs are met

MPF Federal | Baltimore, MD
IT Project Manager | June 2013 – Oct 2016

  • Directed and coordinated activities to ensure progression on-schedule and increase revenue by 10%
  • Evaluated status reports and modified schedules or plans as required for optimal output from staff
  • Created schedules and milestones with inputs from all other teams involved
  • Mitigated obstacles and ensured the team worked effectively to consistently hit deadlines

ISEC | Fulton, MD
Assistant Project Manager | Feb 2010 – June 2013

  • Interpreted contract documents and prepared RFI’s as needed
  • Assisted in the preparation of submittals and shop drawing quality control
  • Coordinated freight, shipping, deliveries, and unload logistics
  • Outsourced materials, purchased as necessary, and estimated project costs

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Arts in Project Management

Ashford University
Graduated 2010

Formatting

Writing a project manager resume that is going to impress a hiring manager starts with the format.

The format of your resume dictates what it is going to look like at first glance, which is extremely important when hiring managers only spend 6 seconds on average, reviewing each resume they look over.

There isn’t one “catch-all” resume format that is going to look good for every person, so it is necessary to pick something that highlights your best features.

However, some formatting standards apply to most resumes when it comes to certain key features.

To start, always stick with a legible font that is distributed evenly with proper spacing to allow important information to stand out and not get lost in a cluster of sentences.

Bullet points allow specific details to stand out more by creating separation between talking points.

Regardless of how things look visually, it is always a safe bet to assume that not everything you write will be read or interpreted.

If you have details that you want to make sure are noticed, then list them as close to the top of the page (or section) as possible.

Listing accomplishments and job history in reverse chronological order should allow your most recent and relevant experience to be more noticeable.

Start With Your Resume Summary

Now that you have selected a solid format for your project manager resume that is sure to catch their attention, it is time to introduce yourself.

A resume summary is your opportunity to list a few fundamental details about yourself as a project manager that will confirm you are a compatible candidate for the position you are seeking.

While you’ll want to be descriptive and lend specific information when necessary, make sure that you are keeping things brief and only writing about two to three sentences.

Before you begin writing this section, ask yourself a few questions.

What qualifications and strengths does a project manager need to excel in this position?

What attributes and experiences do you have that match these strengths and qualifications?

If you can answer these questions and then narrow down the details to what you feel is most pertinent, your resume should be off to a great start.

Yes!

Effective project manager with 10 years of experience in technology and construction industries and proven ability to communicate effectively with client and project team to efficiently ensure project meets objectives in a timely manner. Passion for finding strengths within a team and offering creative solutions to issues before they become problems.

No!

Project manager with experience in various industries and the ability to communicate effectively with clients and team members to get things done. Works well with a team and pushes them to always do their best.

The “Yes” example lists specific details to paint a full picture of the candidate without diving too deep into their background – this successfully grabs attention without giving too much detail.

The “No” example fails to lend enough information regarding the candidate’s experience level and how they manage a team.

PRO TIP: Just because your summary is the first section of your resume doesn’t mean you need to write it first. If you are having trouble deciding what details should be included or left out of this section, try skipping it and coming back. Writing your work history and skills sections should help give you a better idea of what information is necessary for your summary.

Key Accomplishments/Skills & Qualifications

While a resume summary is a great way to introduce yourself and get the ball rolling, it is also vital to include a section that is a bit more eye-catching.

Writing a list of your prime skills and qualifications is essential when trying to show a hiring manager that you meet all of the job requirements they are looking for in a candidate.

Make sure that as you write this section, you keep things simple and only list your attributes on bullet points without any extra wording attached.

The skills you include in this section should cover all of the necessary competencies, both hard and soft, someone would need in the position for which you are applying.

If you aren’t familiar with the term hard skills, they are more often referred to as technical skills.

Hard skills deal with abilities that need to be taught, practiced, and are more job-specific.

Soft skills are the opposite – they are subjective, innate, and are more similar to personality traits.

While it is essential to communicate well with employees and be a motivational leader, it is also important to know how to work in necessary computer programs or have in-depth knowledge of the product/service you are selling.

Both skill types are vital to landing a position as a project manager for any company or project.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise:

  • Scheduling
  • PC Proficiency
  • Bluebeam
  • Motivation
  • Sharepoint
  • Asana
  • XLC
  • SOP
  • RFI
  • AutoCAD
  • Leadership
  • MS Office
  • Strategic Planning
  • Communication
  • Time Management

Or, you can list your skills separated by type.

Hard Skills:

  • Scheduling
  • PC Proficiency
  • Bluebeam
  • Sharepoint
  • Asana
  • RFI
  • AutoCAD

Soft Skills

  • Leadership
  • Motivation
  • Organized
  • Flexible
  • Strategic Planning
  • Communication
  • Time Management

PRO TIP: When writing the skills section on your project manager resume, take the time to reference the job posting you are responding to. You might have an idea of what skills you think are most impressive, but if a job posting lists skills that you haven’t thought to include, it would be a good idea to do so.

Writing Your Work Experience

While every section of your project manager resume is essential, your work history is the section that is going to take the longest to write and will command the most attention.

Hiring managers look at this section of your resume to see if you have the experience to more or less prove the skills and qualifications you claim to have.

When writing this section, it is essential to include jobs that directly related to the position you are applying to.

So, for example, if you are applying to be a project manager at an IT company, and you are deciding whether or not to list a previous job at a cable company or a job at a fitness company, the former is likely your best option.

List your jobs in reverse chronological order when possible because your most recent work is typically your most impressive and relevant.

Once you have decided what previous job roles are best to include and the order you want to list them in, describe each position in three to five bullet points.

Each bullet point should cover a different job task or workplace accomplishment, starting with a particular power word (action verb) to describe how you conducted yourself.

Yes!

Radiant Infotech | Catonsville, MD | Project Manager | Sept 2016 – Present

  • Meet with end-users to identify gaps and improve customer satisfaction by over 10%
  • Prepare agendas & meetings with a project team of 20 people to ensure accomplishment of goals
  • Develop status reports identifying issues, risks, and plans, reducing annual costs by nearly 15%
  • Review requirements and monitor implementation to ensure business needs are met

No!

Radiant Infotech | Catonsville, MD | Project Manager | Sept 2016 – Present

  • Meet with customers to troubleshoot
  • Make agendas and schedule meetings
  • Create various status reports
  • Go over requirements and implementation

The “Yes” example lists specific job tasks and accomplishments with quantifying and qualifying details to highlight the candidate’s strengths and abilities.

The “No” example lists job tasks without any information regarding results or methods, failing to describe a memorable candidate.

PRO TIP: Make sure that you include details that quantify and qualify the job tasks and accomplishments you discuss in your job descriptions. If you are going to say that you increased revenue, give a percentage. If you are going to say that you worked with staff members to meet deadlines, list what you implemented to do so.

(If you lack work experience, see below for a helpful section.)

What are bots?

When writing your project manager resume, it is necessary to consider who is going to be reviewing it once you turn it in.

Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), or bots, are computer systems designed to review and sort through resumes before a hiring manager does.

With so many people applying to work in this field, there are just too many applications to go through to find the right candidate, and bots help alleviate that problem.

When a bot reviews a resume, it looks for specific keywords that are associated with a prime candidate.

If your resume makes the cut, a bot will flag it for further review, and if not, your journey ends there.

In response to the increased use of bots, some resume experts recommend writing your job descriptions with paragraphs instead of bullet points, because it promotes the use of more keywords when writing.

Standard bullet point format:

MPF Federal | Baltimore, MD | IT Project Manager | June 2013 – Oct 2016

  • Directed and coordinated activities to ensure progression on schedule and increase revenue by 10%
  • Evaluated status reports and modified schedules or plans as required for optimal output from staff
  • Created schedules and milestones with inputs from all other teams involved 
  • Mitigated obstacles and ensured the team worked effectively to hit deadlines consistently

Paragraph format:

MPF Federal | Baltimore, MD | IT Project Manager | June 2013 – Oct 2016

Directed and coordinated activities to ensure progression on schedule and increase revenue by 10%. Evaluated status reports and modified schedules or plans as required for optimal output from staff. Created schedules and milestones with inputs from all other teams involved increasing employee satisfaction by 20%. Mitigated obstacles and ensured the team worked effectively to hit deadlines consistently.

Paragraph format w/ bullet points:

MPF Federal | Baltimore, MD | IT Project Manager | June 2013 – Oct 2016

Directed and coordinated activities to ensure progression on schedule. Evaluated status reports and modified schedules or plans as required for optimal output from staff. Created schedules and milestones with inputs from all other teams involved increasing employee satisfaction by 20%. Mitigated obstacles and ensured the team worked effectively to hit deadlines consistently.

  • Created revenue increase by 10%
  • Employee Satisfaction Rating of 97%

While writing in paragraphs can promote the use of more keywords, it is still possible to be intentional about including keywords when writing bullet points.

At Big Interview, we recommend sticking with bullet points to impress hiring managers while paying attention to your use of keywords when writing.

Writing Your Education Section

When writing your education section, it is important to list the most recent and impressive details first then work your way down (e.g., Master’s, Bachelor’s, Associates, etc.).

If you have a Bachelor’s or high degree of education, it isn’t always necessary to include your high school diploma.

For each item, write out the full title of your degree, the year you graduated, and the name of the school you attended.

Example:

Education

Bachelor of Arts in Project Management

Ashford University
Graduated 2010

If you have any additional certifications or licenses related to your field, you can list them in this section as well.

Certifications

PMP Certification – Project Management Institute

Possible Sections to Include

If you have additional accomplishments that would be beneficial to list on your project manager resume, you can always incorporate a section to accommodate those details.

Some sections to consider including are:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What if You Have No Experience?

If you are a recent graduate or you are switching career fields, it can be tricky to decide what adjustments to make on your resume to fit your needs.

For candidates who have an impressive educational background related to project management, or for those who have no work experience to speak of, it is important to focus on your education section.

Start by moving your education section up to just below your resume summary so that it can command more attention.

Add in details to your education section regarding high GPAs, honors, awards, or specific coursework that could show off your hard work and intelligence related to the field.

If you have any volunteer work or internships, including those details can make all the difference for a resume without paid work experience.

If you have work experience that is in a different field, it is still important to include it, and tailor your job descriptions around the job you want.

Focus on discussing job tasks and responsibilities that can still be applied to project management.

Resume Points to Remember

Back to basics

Make sure that you always include your name and contact information at the top of the page where it is clearly noticeable. It is easy to get so caught up in the other aspects of resume writing that you forget the simple details.

Keep it brief

Make sure that you are keeping your resume to no more than one page. Handing in a two-page resume is a good way to make a hiring manager lose interest before they even start reading.

Proper spacing

While you want to fit everything on one page, that doesn’t mean you should sacrifice your format and spacing to pack everything in. Make sure that each section is clearly defined and easy to follow when it comes to visual appearance.

Try to Avoid

Repetition

Don’t start a bullet point with the same word, or cover the same topic as a different bullet point. Each detail you write should present new information written with a new power word to describe how you conduct yourself.

“I” and “me”

While your resume is more or less written in the first-person perspective, you should not write the words “I” or “me” when talking about yourself in a resume.

Lack of research

You can write a great resume that captures all of your most significant features and accomplishments, but if you fail to read up on the company you are applying to, you still might get beat out. If there is a job posting, read up on it to make sure your resume matches what they are looking for.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested power words.)

Helpful Tools:

Project Manager Resume Power Words

  • Administered
  • Founded
  • Adept
  • Formulated
  • Built
  • Implemented
  • Created
  • Improved
  • Consolidated
  • Initiated
  • Coordinated
  • Launched
  • Developed
  • Pioneered
  • Designed
  • Organized

Project Manager Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
RFIFlexibility
AsanaEffective Communication
AutoCADOrganization
BudgetingLeadership
SchedulingDetail Oriented