Your architect resume should show off all you have to offer as an architect. You see the world differently, and you meld seemingly opposing concepts together to create structure and design.

The skills and knowledge necessary to seamlessly put together art and math to create the world we live in is an ability that few can harness.

You are an architect.

You specialize in creation that is safe, functional, and often beautiful.

Though, while your skills and intelligence might have gotten you through school, you understand that your job also requires sales.

No matter your strengths, you need to be able to sell your concepts.

You can have the most innovative designs that, if not presented in the right way, may fall on deaf ears.

What’s even harder than selling your concepts is being able to sell yourself.

Explaining to people why you are the best person for a specific job is no easy task, and it takes more thought and consideration than many people care to give it.

In many cases, the first step to making a good first impression is through writing a resume, and while you might not have that skill down pat, rest assured that we do.

Let’s get started!

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample architect to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best architect you possibly can.

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Architect Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Richard Peterson
RPeterson@email.com
1 (718) 572-0808
New York, NY 10013
linkedin.com/petersonrichard

Summary Statement:

Architect: Accomplished and versatile architect with a broad portfolio of original designs created throughout 10 years of professional experience. Skilled at transforming existing spaces and working from a retro aesthetic. Known for close collaboration with clients and completing projects on deadline. Experienced with both urban and rural settings, with consulting expertise on both commercial and residential projects.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • AutoCAD LT (Windows)
  • V-Ray Software
  • Building Codes
  • Client Acquisition
  • 3D Design and Conceptualization
  • Project Presentation
  • Revit
  • Project Management
  • Organization
  • Client Communication
  • Reliable
  • Problem Solving
  • Creative

Professional Experience:

New City Architectural Firm, New York, NY
SENIOR ARCHITECT | September 2015-Present

  • Led a team of 5+ architects on design of high-end commercial spaces
  • Utilized AutoCAD software to draft architectural plans for bars, restaurant, and hotels
  • Creatively collaborated with clients to convert warehouses into retail environments
  • Bid for and consistently acquired contracts through focused pitching and salesmanship
  • Provided project oversight from planning to construction, consistently meeting budget within 98%

Johnson Architectural, White Plains, NY
JUNIOR ARCHITECT | June 2013 – July 2015

  • Assisted with drafting, planning, and building residential designs resulting in 10% less rework
  • Designed improved interior spaces using V-Ray software
  • Adapted client specifications into workable concepts under budget
  • Managed building code adherence and zoning applications

Ralston Architect and Design, New York, NY
ARCHITECTURAL INTERN | June 2010 – May 2013

  • Built digital 3D architectural models for clients
  • Presented creative ideas and models for urban and rural projects
  • Brainstormed with fellow interns about approaches and methods
  • Developed concepts for office spaces

Education/Certifications

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND URBAN STUDIES
New York University, New York, NY,
Class of 2013

Certified Architect with the State of New York

Formatting

As an architect, you likely understand the importance of visual style combined with functionality.

While it is essential to consider what you want your architect resume to say, before that, you must first consider what you want it to look like.

The format you select for your resume is the first thing anyone is going to notice when they sit down to read it.

When hiring managers only spend 6 seconds on average reading the resumes that they review, you could say that the format you select is kind of a big deal.

So what details dictate whether or not a format is any good?

To start, a format should create a neat and professional appearance for your resume that pulls readers in and keeps their eyes moving down the page.

Start with selecting a legible font and mixing it with even spacing that will create clean lines that are easy to read and follow.

Bullet points allow for more separation in between talking points, which in turn allows your more impactful information to stand out on the page.

Make sure that you are listing your most impressive information as early on as possible because most hiring managers will not have the time to read through your architect resume in its entirety.

Listing items in reverse chronological order is a decent structure to follow because typically your most impressive and relevant work is your most recent.

It is crucial to try to stand out with your resume visually; however, make sure that you steer clear from overdoing it.

It is fair to get a little creative as long as you are not sacrificing the readability of your architect resume for a flashy font or format that could distract from your talking points.

A decent resume format should always serve the purpose of reinforcing your main points while also drawing attention to your best details.

Start With Your Resume Summary

Now that you have taken the time to think about how you want your architect resume to appear overall, it is time to begin writing, starting with your resume summary.

A resume summary focuses on describing yourself as an architect and what your primary qualifications consist of.

When writing this section, be sure to lend some specific details and descriptions while remaining concise by limiting it to no more than three sentences.

If you are trying to either come up with what details to include or narrow things down, try to start by asking yourself some generalized questions.

“What skills, experiences, and qualifications are important for an architect to have to do their job well?”

“How do I fulfill or exceed the criteria necessary to meet those expectations?”

Once you have answered these questions, you can work your way back by pulling out the details you find to be most impressive about yourself in regards to architecture.

Yes!

Accomplished and versatile architect with a broad portfolio of original designs created throughout 10 years of professional experience. Skilled at transforming existing spaces and working from a retro aesthetic. Known for close collaboration with clients and completing projects on deadline. Experienced with both urban and rural settings, with consulting expertise on both commercial and residential projects.

No!

Architect with a portfolio of original designs made throughout many years of professional experience. Able to alter existing spaces and work with various aesthetics. Good with clients and meeting deadlines. Can work in various settings and project types.

The “Yes!” example lends specific details to describe the candidate’s areas of experience and expertise while implementing strong and direct diction to illustrate their abilities.

The “No!” example describes the candidate with bland and not impactful wording without specific details about their experience and knowledge.

PRO TIP : If you are having trouble deciding what information to include in your resume summary, skip it and come back. Writing your work experience and your skills sections before you write your summary can help you differentiate what details are most pertinent and what can be left out.

Key Accomplishments/ Skills & Qualifications

When writing your architect resume, always incorporate a section that outlines any specific job requirements that you meet.

This section of your resumes should be laid out as a simple list of bullet points that address your skills and qualifications that are necessary to architecture.

The types of skills a company might look for can range anywhere from experience using specific software to sales abilities to pitch your concepts.

The items you include in this list should be diverse and cover a wide array of both hard and soft skills.

Hard skills are more commonly known as technical skills.

Most technical skills need to be taught or practiced to master, and they are often more job-specific than other types of skills.

It takes time and effort to master working in CAD or learning how to manage an architecture project competently – they aren’t skills that come naturally even if you pick them up quickly.

Soft skills are most often referred to as people skills.

Soft skills are more closely related to personality traits because they are more innate and can’t always be taught.

Being flexible, organized, and punctual are all important characteristics to have when working in almost any field, including architecture.

Make sure that as you are deciding what skills and qualifications to incorporate in this section of your architect resume that you mention both types of skills.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • AutoCAD LT (Windows)
  • V-Ray Software
  • Building Codes
  • Client Acquisition
  • 3D Design and Conceptualization
  • Project Presentation
  • Revit
  • Project Management
  • Organization
  • Client Communication
  • Reliable
  • Problem Solving
  • Creative

PRO TIP: Look over the job posting you are responding to or read up on the company you are applying to as you write your resume. Include the skills and qualifications that best suit the job you are applying for, and don’t just write the same list for every application you send out.

Writing Your Work Experience

While your skills and qualifications list should generally grab more of your reader’s attention initially, it is time to hold their attention with an impressive list of your work experience.

When deciding what jobs to include in your architect resume, make decisions based on relevance and impressiveness.

If you have various architecture jobs to choose from, try to select companies that you have worked for or projects you have worked on that are more similar to what you are trying to do now.

It is relatively standard to list your work experience in reverse chronological order so that your most recent work comes first.

Often your most current work is your most impressive, and hiring managers typically want to see what you have been up to most recently.

Once you have decided what work is the most relevant to include on your resume, describe each opportunity with three to five bullet points.

Yes!

New City Architectural Firm | New York, NY | Senior Architect | September 2015-Present

  • Led a team of 5+ architects on design of high-end commercial spaces
  • Utilized AutoCAD software to draft architectural plans for bars, restaurant, and hotels
  • Creatively collaborated with clients to convert warehouses into retail environments
  • Bid for and consistently acquired contracts through focused pitching and salesmanship
  • Provided project oversight from planning to construction, consistently meeting budget

No!

New City Architectural Firm | New York, NY | Senior Architect | September 2015-Present

  • Led a team on various projects
  • Utilized architecture software
  • Worked with clients
  • Bid for contracts

The “Yes!” example clearly quantifies and qualifies details in the descriptions to lend specific information that empowers the accomplishments of the candidate.

The “No!” example lists the same job responsibilities without the details needed to highlight the candidate’s strengths and abilities.

PRO TIP: Quantifying and qualifying details in your job descriptions is imperative to make sure that you are setting yourself apart for other candidates and writing your bullet points as impactful and memorable as possible.

(If you lack work experience, see below for a helpful section.)

What are bots?

As you write your architect resume, be sure to take into account that it might be reviewed by an Applicant Tracking System (ATS), otherwise known as a bot.

Bots are programs designed to assist companies in the hiring process by reviewing and sorting resumes before hiring managers take a look.

When a bot reviews a resume, it searches it for particular keywords (distinctive adjectives) and power words (action verbs) to see if the resume meets the potential that a company is looking for in a candidate.

Due to the increased use of bots in the hiring process, some resume experts believe that writing your job descriptions in bullet points doesn’t allow candidates enough freedom to include a wide range of keywords.

These resume experts believe that writing job descriptions in paragraphs will encourage candidates to utilize more keywords when writing.

Standard bullet point format:

Johnson Architectural | White Plains, NY | Junior Architect | June 2013 – July 2015

  • Assisted with drafting, planning, and building private residential designs requiring less rework than collaborators
  • Designed improved interior spaces using V-Ray software
  • Adapted client specifications into workable concepts under budget
  • Managed building code adherence and zoning applications

Paragraph format:

Johnson Architectural | White Plains, NY | Junior Architect | June 2013 – July 2015

Assisted fellow architects with drafting, planning, and building private residential designs that required 10% less rework than collaborators. Designed improved interior spaces using V-Ray software. Adapted client specifications into workable concepts with budgets coming in up to 15% lower than competitor designs. Managed building code adherence and zoning applications.

Paragraph format:

Johnson Architectural | White Plains, NY | Junior Architect | June 2013 – July 2015
Assisted fellow architects with drafting, planning, and building private residential designs that required 10% less rework than collaborators. Designed improved interior spaces using V-Ray software. Adapted client specifications into workable concepts with budgets coming in up to 15% lower than competitor designs. Managed building code adherence and zoning applications.

  • Led over 20 sales projects
  • Worked on budgets of up to $2 million

At Big Interview, we believe that it is still possible to include the necessary amount of keywords while using bullet points if you are intentional.

We suggest sticking with bullet point format to ensure that when your resume gets through the review of a bot, it is still in the optimal format to impress a hiring manager.

Writing Your Education Section

When writing your education section, it is best to be clear and concise – especially if you have enough relevant work experience to fill out your architect resume.

List your education in order of impressiveness (e.g., Master’s, bachelor’s, associates).

When you list your education, always include the full title of your degree, the school you attended, and the year you graduated.

You can also list any certifications or licenses in your education section as well, or create a separate section directly below or above your education.

Example:

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Architectural Design and Urban Studies
New York University, New York, NY,
Class of 2013

Certified Architect with the State of New York

Possible Sections to Include

It is acceptable to add in a section or two to accommodate any credentials or details that you feel are appropriate to include on your architect resume.

Some additional sections to consider including are:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What If You Have No Experience?

If you are a recent graduate, it might feel a bit intimidating to apply for positions and go up against candidates with more experience than yourself.

While those feelings are understandable, it is essential not to let them inhibit you as you write your architect resume and work your way through the hiring process.

Focus on creating a resume that centers around the experience and accomplishments that you do have.

Start with your education section by moving it directly below your summary to allow it a more prime position on your resume.

Expand on your education with any impressive details that could show off your intelligence and abilities.

High GPAs, honors, awards, notable coursework, or projects can be great details to include on a resume when you don’t have any workforce experience.

Once you have added in relevant academic achievements, make sure that you consider including any internships or volunteer work that you have related to architecture.

Unpaid work still qualifies as experience and is the best way to get your foot in the door, and your career started.

Resume Points to Remember

Keep it simple

Don’t overdo it with graphics and unnecessary “flare” on your resume. While it is crucial to stand out among the rest, make sure that you are doing so with your words and details. Your format and style should only highlight the important information that you already want to include and not the other way around.

Quantify and qualify

Lending specific numbers and details to your job descriptions is key in making sure that you write an impressive resume. Anyone can say that they came in under budget or that they planned architecture concepts. However, if you say how often you came in under budget, or by how much, and list the programs you used to assist with your designs your resume just became that much more unique and impactful.

Power words

When you are writing your resume, it is always important to use power words and be intentional about how you use them. Start bullet points with power words, and make sure that you don’t repeat them. Make sure that you are using the most impactful and distinct word available to describe what you are trying to convey.

Try to Avoid

Write more than one page

Regardless of how much experience you might have, it is never impressive to write a resume that goes over one page in length. Hiring managers are busy, there are an endless amount of applications for them to review, and everything you need to say can be easily covered in one page – we promise.

Copy and paste

While there are going to be aspects of your resume that are transferable from application to application, make sure that you are tailoring every resume for each job you are applying to. Reference job postings as you write your resume and make sure each detail you include is the most impactful for each individual job.

Saving the best for first

Never assume that your resume is going to be read all the way through. When writing each section, always put the most impressive and relevant information first. Often hiring managers are going to skim your resume when they first review it rather than read it through, so make sure what they see is the best you’ve got.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested power words.)

Helpful Tools:

Architect Resume Power Words

  • Administered
  • Founded
  • Adept
  • Formulated
  • Built
  • Implemented
  • Created
  • Improved
  • Consolidated
  • Initiated
  • Coordinated
  • Launched
  • Developed
  • Pioneered
  • Designed
  • Organized

Architect Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
RevitOrganization
AutoCAD LTClient Communication
V-Ray SoftwareCreativity
Building CodesProblem Solving
BudgetingDetail Oriented