Your flight attendant resume is one of the last things that stand in the way of you and soaring into your new dream job.

People count on you to keep them comfortable and safe when they fly to new destinations.

You are responsible for all things customer service-related on a flight, and there is so much more you do behind the scenes as well.

Landing a job for a good company in this competitive field requires a wide range of skills and qualifications to get your foot in the door.

While you do get to travel for a living — which sounds great on paper — you also get to deal with all of the difficulties that come with traveling from flight delays, cancellations, and layovers.

Needless to say, you are an extraordinary person if you are able to (A) work well in this field, and (B) have the desire to work in this field.

But before you can board your next flight, you’ll need to create the perfect resume to get your foot in the door.

So, let’s work this resume out together and send you on your way!

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample flight attendant resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best flight attendant resume you possibly can.

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Flight Attendant Resume (Text Version)

CONTACT INFO:

Victoria Lofton
vlofton@gmail.com
(619) 342-0349
San Diego, CA 22434
linkedin.com/vlofton

SUMMARY STATEMENT

Flight Attendant: Experienced and enthusiastic flight attendant who excels in customer service and safety procedures for domestic and international flights. Serves as a team member to fellow in-flight crew to execute outstanding in-flight experiences to all passengers. Adapts quickly in high-pressure situations and provides efficient and timely solutions.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

  • Customer Service
  • Emergency Procedures
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Team-oriented
  • Adaptable
  • FAA Adherence
  • Discretion
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • CPR and First Aid
  • Fluent in Spanish
  • Problem Solving
  • Jet Bridge Maintenance
  • Bootstrap

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

Delta Airlines
Flight Attendant | San Diego, CA | March 2013–Present

  • Create a comfortable and safe in-flight environment for all passengers by providing prompt and friendly customer service
  • Conduct pre-flight inspections ensuring the aircraft is in compliance with federal safety regulations, FAA, and company regulations
  • Promote airline rewards programs increasing sign-ups by 5%
  • Completed over 4,000 hours of international and domestic flights while serving over 400 passengers on both Boeing and Airbus commercial jets

American Airlines
Flight Attendant | San Diego, CA | May 2010–January 2013

  • Educated passengers on all safety regulations and executed safety procedures for emergency landings
  • Greeted passengers while directing them to the appropriate seat
  • Communicated effectively with flight crew to fulfill in-flight service duties

Southwest Airlines
Flight Attendant | Los Angeles, CA | May 2009–May 2010

  • Responded to emergency situations in a quick and calm manner while briefing crew members
  • Prepared and delivered food and beverages to passengers while ensuring supply of all products
  • Resolved passenger conflicts by utilizing interpersonal communication to de-escalate situations

EDUCATION/CERTIFICATION

Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies
California State University, Sacramento, CA
May 2009

Formatting

Airlines put a strong emphasis on the appearance of their flight attendants, and for a good reason.

You are the face of the airline you work for, so you are expected to look neat and professional.

The same is true when it comes to your resume.

The format of a resume is the first thing a hiring manager is going to notice, and that is important, considering they only spend six seconds on average looking over each resume they review.

While you can choose from many different resume formats and fonts, there are still guidelines that, if followed correctly, will help create an eye-catching resume.

To start, you should always list the most important and relevant information first by structuring your flight attendant resume in reverse chronological order.

Utilizing bullet points can create adequate spacing between specific details and allow for vital information to become more noticeable.

Even spacing also creates a professional and easy to follow appearance that guides your readers’ eyes down the page.

Always use a clear and legible font to allow for optimal readability as well.

Following these basic guidelines will get your resume noticed for all the right reasons.

Start With Your Flight Attendant Resume Summary

While the first section of a resume traditionally has been an “objective,” the resume summary is now the standard.

Resume objectives have been done away with due to their lack of providing detailed information that allows hiring managers to get to know a candidate better.

The goal of a resume summary, however, is to describe who you are as a flight attendant, as precisely as possible, in two to three sentences.

Let’s look at a few examples.

Yes!

Experienced and enthusiastic flight attendant who excels in customer service and safety procedures for domestic and international flights. Serves as a team member to fellow in-flight crew to execute outstanding in-flight experiences to all passengers. Adapts quickly in high-pressure situations and provides efficient and timely solutions.

No!

Flight attendant who gives great customer service and safety on flights. Works well with all team members to take care of passengers. Able to deal with intense situations and work well under pressure.

The “Yes!” example includes persuasive and specific keywords to describe who the candidate is as a crew member as well as their work ethic and values overall.

The “No!” example explains how the candidate handles job tasks with basic wording that would fail to peak the interest of readers, and wouldn’t set them apart from other candidates.

PRO TIP: When writing your resume summary, it can be challenging to narrow down details to the most important and impressive. Try writing the other sections of your flight attendant resume first to allow yourself to think through the job and your previous experience to describe yourself more accurately.

Key Accomplishments/ Skills & Qualifications

It is always important to include a list of your various skills and qualifications related to working as a flight attendant.

When hiring managers are reviewing resumes, they want to be able to see at a glance if you meet their requirements, so this section needs to remain minimalistic in detail.

Let’s look at an example.

Example:

  • Customer Service
  • Emergency Procedures
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Team-oriented
  • Adaptable
  • FAA Adherence
  • Discretion
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • CPR and First Aid
  • Fluent in Spanish
  • Problem Solving
  • Jet Bridge Maintenance
  • Bootstrap

When writing your own list of skills and qualifications, it is important to include both hard skills and soft skills.

Hard skills are often referred to as technical skills because they typically need to be taught and/or practiced to implement.

Soft skills are more commonly known as people skills; these are the kinds of skills that are more innate and help you work well with others.

Both kinds of skills are necessary to be a great flight attendant.

You need to know how to ensure in-flight safety and efficiency while also being able to tend to passenger needs.

PRO TIP: Job postings will often list the kinds of skills they are looking for in a flight attendant. Make sure that you include qualifications that are either listed in the job posting or that you have researched the company to base your skills list around.

Writing Your Work Experience

Your work experience section will typically make up the bulk of your resume.

While the other sections of your flight attendant resume layout details describing your overall knowledge and abilities, this section allows you to list some specifics about where your skills have been put to work.

When deciding what work history to include in this section, always make sure that you are only including previous jobs that have applicable skills to this industry.

Usually, you should try to list your work experience in reverse chronological order because companies want to know what you have been up to most recently.

Once you have decided what jobs are the most beneficial to include on your resume, come up with three to five bullet points describing some of your most impressive accomplishments and daily work responsibilities.

Yes!

Delta Airlines | San Diego, CA | Flight Attendant | March 2013–Present
• Create a comfortable and safe in-flight environment for all passengers by providing prompt and friendly customer service
• Conduct pre-flight inspections ensuring the aircraft is in compliance with federal safety regulations, FAA, and company regulations
• Promote airline rewards programs increasing sign-ups by 5%
• Completed over 4,000 hours of international and domestic flights while serving over 400 passengers on both Boeing and Airbus commercial jets

No!

Delta Airlines | San Diego, CA | Flight Attendant | March 2013–Present
• Create a comfortable and safe in-flight environment
• Conduct pre-flight inspections
• Promote airline rewards programs
• Completed many hours of international and domestic flights

The “Yes!” example lends specific details to explain how the candidate completed their tasks and excelled in providing customer service.

The “No!” example lists job tasks without any information on how they were carried out and what the results were due to the candidate’s work.

PRO TIP: When writing your job descriptions, always try to quantify and qualify the tasks you are describing. Lending details that show results and experience with numbers and specific examples allows hiring managers to gain a better sense of your abilities and experience.

(If you lack work experience, see below for a helpful section.)

About Bots

When writing your resume, always be mindful that many companies use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), or bots, to review resumes.

Becoming a flight attendant can be a complicated venture due to the competitiveness of the field.

Hiring managers often don’t have the amount of time needed to review every single application they receive, so bots help them narrow things down.

Bots search resumes for specific keywords to decipher whether or not they belong to good potential candidates.

When a bot “likes” a resume, it will flag it; if a bot does not find a resume attractive for the company, that resume will likely end up lost in the shuffle.

Some resume experts believe that writing job descriptions in paragraph format, as opposed to bullet points, makes it easier for candidates to use more keywords.

Standard Bullet Point Format:

American Airlines
Flight Attendant | San Diego, CA | May 2010–January 2013

  • Educated passengers on all safety regulations and executed safety procedures for emergency landings
  • Greeted passengers while directing them to the appropriate seat
  • Communicated effectively with flight crew to fulfill in-flight service duties

Paragraph Format:

American Airlines
Flight Attendant | San Diego, CA | May 2010–January 2013
Educated passengers on all safety regulations and executed safety procedures for emergency landings. Greeted passengers and welcomed them aboard the aircraft while directing them to the appropriate seat. Communicated effectively with flight crew to fulfill in-flight service duties.

In some cases, people use a mixture of both styles by writing their work history in paragraph format and then including a few bullet points below.

Paragraph Format w/ Bullet Points

American Airlines
Flight Attendant | San Diego, CA | May 2010–January 2013
Educated passengers on all safety regulations and executed safety procedures for emergency landings. Greeted passengers and welcomed them aboard the aircraft while directing them to the appropriate seat. Communicated effectively with flight crew to fulfill in-flight service duties.

  • 97% positive passenger reviews
  • Strict adherence to FAA guidelines

At Big Interview, we believe using bullet points to format your job descriptions is still the best way to go.

Bullet points allow for hiring managers to more easily scan over your resume, and you can still be intentional about including keywords when writing.

Writing Your Education Section

Include your highest degree of education first while listing the title of your degree, the school you attended, and the year you graduated.

If you have additional certifications and licenses to include you can include them in this section, or split them into their own.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies
California State University, Sacramento, CA
May 2009

Example:

  • CPR and First Aid Certified, 2018

Possible Sections to Include

If you have more accomplishments and qualifications to include in your resume that don’t belong in the standard sections, you can always create a section to accommodate those details.

Some additional sections to consider including are:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What If You Have No Experience?

If you are just recently trying to become a flight attendant because you either just graduated or you are switching fields, you can still create a flight attendant resume that fits your specifications.

Start by moving your education section up below the summary section of your resume.

Try to improve upon the details included in your education section by providing any additional information concerning high GPAs, or honors and awards.

Enhancing your education section when you have no work experience is essential to show that you are a competent and intelligent individual.

If you have work experience outside of flight attending, keep your education section where it is and try to focus on explaining relevant job responsibilities that could be applied when you are a flight attendant.

Focus on details that deal with health and safety, punctuality, and customer service.

Outside of your existing sections, you can always include sections that go over any internships or volunteer work you have completed.

If you have no previous work history, sometimes your best way in the door of your first job is by showing that you have unpaid experience.

Flight Attendant Resume Points to Remember

Make an impression

Keep your flight attendant resume format clear and professional. You want to catch a hiring manager’s attention by selecting a format that highlights your best traits and keeps things moving along with a legible font.

Check your work

When you are done writing your resume, always take the time to look over what you have written. Don’t let a minor mistake cost you an interview that you may never have a chance for again.

Let it breathe

Make sure that you are providing proper spacing between sections and bullet points. An overcrowded resume will appear messy and difficult to follow. If you have to narrow down details to make it work, it will be worth the sacrifice.

Try to Avoid

Writing a second page

Never try to make room for your accomplishments by writing a two-page resume. A busy hiring manager will not be impressed with a resume that takes up more of their time than necessary.

Repeating words

Make sure that you aren’t using the same keywords or power words (action verbs) more than once. Each bullet point you write should start with a fresh new word to describe yourself and your experience.

Forgetting the little things

Sometimes the most mundane tasks are the most important. Make sure that you include your name and contact information on your resume. People get so caught up in the other details that sometimes they forget the simplest things of all.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested power words.)

Helpful Tools

Flight Attendant Resume Power Words

  • Administered
  • Founded
  • Adept
  • Formulated
  • Built
  • Implemented
  • Created
  • Improved
  • Consolidated
  • Initiated
  • Coordinated
  • Launched
  • Developed
  • Pioneered
  • Designed
  • Organized

Flight Attendant Resume Skills List

Hard SkillsSoft Skills
CPR and First AidCustomer Service
Spanish SpeakingOrganized
Emergency ProceduresAdaptable
Boeing and AirbusProblem Solving