Resume Template: Video Editor

by | Resume Templates, Resume Templates: Creative

So you’ve just seen a posting for your dream job and now it’s time to dust off your old video editor resume.

As a video editor, you recognize the importance of presentation.

You also understand what it is like trying to decipher what someone else’s vision is and make it come to fruition.

You could say that one of your strongest skill sets is finding out what other people want, even when they don’t know what they want themselves.

Part counselor, part content creator, people don’t always realize the amount of both technical and creative skills involved in putting together exceptional media.

When so few clients truly understand what you do, and a flood of inexperienced people are ready to offer up their editing services with undercutting rates, you need a video editor resume that truly stands out among the crowd.

That’s where we come in.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample video editor resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best video editor resume you possibly can.

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Video Editor Resume (Text Version)

CONTACT INFO:

Stephanie Tates
STates@email.com
1 (503) 555-0055
New York, NY 10007
Film Reel: stephanietatesdesign.com

SUMMARY STATEMENT

Video Editor: Creative video artist who works in collaboration with producers, directors, and clients to give life to their vision through the use of cutting edge video editing technologies. Key awards and honors include: Clio Award: Best Editing for a Short Film (Nominee), Addy Award: Editing for a National Commercial Campaign (Winner), and editing spots for primetime television.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

  • Premiere Pro
  • Adobe After Effects
  • Photoshop
  • SAN
  • Lighting Design
  • Color Correction
  • Avid Digidesign
  • AJAX

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

CBS Corporation
Video Editing Manager | Richmond, VA | March 2016-Present

  • Meet daily with Producers to cover topics for nightly broadcasts and highlights
  • Manage a team of 3 video editors to create a consistent brand message
  • Utilize Adobe AfterEffects and Apple Final Cut Pro to create segments from 30 seconds to 5 minutes
  • Collaborate with other creative managers on Breaking News Segments

Blue Brand Media
Video Editor | Richmond, VA | January 2012 – March 2016

  • Led editing team for on site filming locations and in-house editing
  • Participated with production and post-production to meet deadlines for clients
  • Created on brand content for a variety of clients across multiple industries with target audiences
  • Implemented video software and color correction to provide multiple choices in final cuts for clients

SC Production
Junior Video Editor | Norfolk, VA | June 2011-December 2012

  • Compiled a variety of images and research for lead editors to utilize during post-production
  • Responsible for working with production assistants on scheduled shoots and deadlines
  • Edited, designed and mixed 30 second television spots for national campaign
  • Mixed audio and video levels utilizing waveforms

EDUCATION/CERTIFICATION

Bachelor of Arts in Communication
Concentration: Media
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Class of 2011

Formatting

Just like when editing a video, it is essential to grab your audience’s attention quickly.

On average, hiring managers will only look at your resume an estimated 6-seconds before moving on.

So, you will want to grab their attention and then keep them reading with a well-formulated resume.

To grab their attention and keep it, it is important to have a neat and distinct format.

Always start with the most important details first by listing things in reverse chronological order, and guide their eyes with proper spacing and legible font.

If you follow these guidelines, it will be easy to make your most relevant and impressive skills stand out.

Start With Your Resume Summary

Starting with a short summary that is rich with specific details is the best way to get your video editor resume off the ground.

When selecting what skill sets to talk about, try to be selective and only list things that are relevant to the job for which you are applying.

If a hiring manager is only going to look at your resume for 6-seconds, you want to make sure that whatever they notice makes an impact.

That is why getting too wordy or being repetitive is a good way to waste space and your shot at the job.

Let’s look at a few examples of what we are talking about:

Yes!

Creative video artist who works in collaboration with producers, directors, and clients to give life to their vision through the use of cutting edge video editing technologies. Key awards and honors include: Clio Award: Best Editing for a Short Film (Nominee), Addy Award: Editing for a National Commercial Campaign (Winner), and editing spots for primetime television.

No!

Video editor who works in collaboration with everyone to create great content. Edited for spots on television and won awards and honors.

The “Yes!” example uses strong language to convey the inventive and specialized skills the editor implements in creating content, as well as a specific list of honors and awards.

The “No!” example uses general words that make the editor’s skills fall flat and sound less compelling. Not to mention there are no specifics utilized at all. Any one of a hundred video editor resumes could say the exact same thing.

Key Accomplishments/ Skills & Qualifications

While a summary is important, the fact that it is written in paragraph format means it’s not super eye-catching at a glance.

Including a section for key accomplishments and notable skills in bullet points is a great way to make your unique accomplishments stand out.

This list can include awards, editing software you are fluent in, work-based accomplishments, and skills that you have acquired throughout your time as an editor.

The goal is to pick things that will relate to the job you are applying to, and that will separate you from the pack.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Premiere Pro
  • Adobe After Effects
  • Photoshop
  • SAN
  • Lighting Design
  • Color Correction
  • Avid Digidesign
  • AJAX

When you are trying to include impressive skills on this list, it is necessary to note that there are two main types, hard skills and soft skills.

Hard skills are commonly referred to as technical skills; these are skills that can be practiced and quantified.

Soft skills are commonly known as people skills, and they are generally something specific to your personality or work ethic.

When it comes to video editing, hard skills are essential, especially if you are applying to a job that requires specific software experience, so list everything you’ve got.

It is also necessary to include some soft skills on the list so that they know that you can handle the people skills too – at least enough to be dependable and pleasant to work with.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skills to include in your video editor resume.)

Writing Your Work Experience

Now it is time to add some real substance to your resume – your work history.

You’ve done a lot of talking about your skills and qualifications. Your goal now is to list a work history that backs that up.

You will want to list your previous jobs in reverse chronological order so that your most recent and relevant employment is seen first.

A bonus to listing your work history out in this way is that your most impressive job is usually your most recent, and you will want it right at the top.

How long you have been in the field will dictate how much job history you have to work with, but whenever possible only list jobs that are related to the field.

Instead of listing the front desk job you had while in school, list the summer you spent as an assistant editor for that local production company.

Along with each job you list out, you will want to include three to five bullet points that describe what tasks the job required and, therefore, the skills you have gained.

See the examples below:

Yes!

Blue Brand MediaVideo EditorRichmond, VAJanuary 2012 – March 2016
• Led editing team for on-site filming locations and in-house editing
• Participated with production and post-production to meet deadlines for clients
• Created on-brand content for a variety of clients across multiple industries with target audiences
• Implemented Adobe After Effects, Premiere Pro and color correction to provide account executives multiple choices in final cuts for clients

No!

Blue Brand MediaVideo EditorRichmond, VAJanuary 2012 – March 2016
• Worked with editing team
• Made content for clients
• Worked with editing software

The “Yes!” example lists out the job tasks in a way that showcases the candidate’s skills by using distinctive and robust wording, as well as specific skills utilized.

The “No!” example reuses the same weak words, is not specific, and, therefore, cannot show off how the candidate’s specific skills and work ethic affected the day-to-day work positively.

PRO TIP: Use the job posting when you are drafting your video editor resume to include the specific keywords related to the skills and editing software that they are looking for in a candidate.

More About Bots

It’s important to note that the use of Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) has become increasingly more popular when companies are looking for a new hire.

These systems, also known as bots, are used to flag resumes that are a good match for the company.

In order to impress a bot, you need to include as many keywords as possible in your video editor resume. (The good news is, you can pull these right from the job posting. Just be sure to include exactly the same words. For instance, don’t use the keyword “photo-editing” if the job post specifically lists “Photoshop.”)

It is due to these bots that some people have started recommending writing your work experience in paragraph format to pack in as many keywords as possible.

Standard Bulletpoint Format

CBS CorporationVideo Editing ManagerRichmond, VAMarch 2016-Present

  • Meet daily with Producers to cover topics for nightly broadcasts and highlights
  • Manage a team of 3 video editors on style and content to create a consistent brand message
  • Utilize video editing software such as Adobe AfterEffects and Apple Final Cut Pro to create segments ranging from 30 seconds to 5 minutes
  • Collaborate with other creative area managers to cut down on filming to editing time on Breaking News Segments

Paragraph Format

CBS CorporationVideo Editing Manager Richmond, VAMarch 2016–Present

Regularly meet with producers to cover topics for nightly broadcasts and highlights, while managing a team of three video editors on style and content to create a consistent brand message. Consistently utilize video editing software such as Adobe AfterEffects and Apple Final Cut Pro to create segments ranging from 30 seconds to 5 minutes. Collaborate with other creative area managers to cut down on filming to editing time on Breaking News Segments
  
A third alternative is to add a few bullet points below your paragraph to grab attention.

CBS CorporationVideo Editing Manager Richmond, VAMarch 2016–Present

Regularly meet with producers to cover topics for nightly broadcasts and highlights, while managing a team of three video editors on style and content to create a consistent brand message. Consistently utilize video editing software such as Adobe AfterEffects and Apple Final Cut Pro to create segments ranging from 30 seconds to 5 minutes. Collaborate with other creative area managers to cut down on filming to editing time on Breaking News Segments
   

  • Adobe AfterEffects
  • Final Cut Pro

We suggest using bullet point format while being mindful to include as many powerful keywords as possible to satisfy an ATS.

Writing Your Education Section

Your education section will consist of a list of your degrees (Associates, Bachelor’s, etc.) and relevant workshops, concentrations, and certifications.

Similar to your work history, you will want your most impressive and recent achievements listed first.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts in Communication
Concentration: Media
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Class of 2011

Example:

  • Adobe Premier Pro Certification
  • Apple Final Cut Certification

Possible Sections to Include

You can also include additional sections on your resume where you see fit.

Here are some ideas:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What if You Have No Experience?

If you have only recently graduated or switched careers, you might have a lack of job history to work with on your resume.

When this is the case, it is important to stay confident and let your education section shine.

You will want to list your education directly below your summary instead of after your work history.

You will also want to include as many relevant details in this section as possible.

Think of certifications, workshops, specified courses, and various editing software that you can list to show that you still know what you are doing.

Including these details can show the hiring manager that you take the field seriously and aren’t coming into the job too green.

Video Editor Resume Points to Remember

Remember the basics

When writing your resume, it’s easy to get caught up in all the rules of what to include and how. When writing job history and education, always include where, when, and what you did (your job title or specified degree).

Use varied diction

Always make sure that you are using strong words to describe yourself and your work and make sure you aren’t repeating anything. You don’t want to sound redundant.

Talk to yourself

When reviewing your resume, it is always a good idea to check your work. Don’t be afraid to read it out loud to yourself to get a good feel for how it sounds.

Things to Avoid

Don’t try too hard

Obviously, you’re going to try hard to get the job you want. What you don’t want to do is resort to odd ways of trying to get noticed out of desperation. Avoid using flashy fonts or overly odd formatting. Let your skills speak for themselves.

Don’t write more than a page

In some cases, it might be hard to narrow down your work experience or skills. Make sure you are decisive when determining what to include and avoid handing in a two-page resume.

Don’t say “I” or “me”

It might be tempting to talk in the first person, but this is a resume “no-no.” Additionally, it is already implied that you are talking about yourself.

Some Helpful Tools

Video Editor Power Words

  • Administered
  • Adept
  • Built
  • Created
  • Consolidated
  • Coordinated
  • Developed
  • Designed
  • Founded
  • Formulated
  • Implemented
  • Improved
  • Initiated
  • Launched

Video Editor Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
Adobe Premiere Pro Dedicated
Avid Digidesign Pro Tools Creative
AfterEffects Problem Solving
Photoshop Punctual
Apple Final Cut Pro Collaborative