Teachers – you create the future.

Your job is to teach children and teenagers alike to excel in various subjects as well as individually.

It’s no secret that your job is habitually underrated, and few people understand what really goes into being a skilled teacher.

You have to teach (obviously), you have to grade assignments, lesson plan, buy supplies, tutor struggling students, prep for testing, conduct conferences, go to meetings, and so much more.

Your job is multifaceted, and through all of that, you have to show up and care.

You have to care about what you do in a way that not many people in other fields understand.

You have to want to do what you do because if you don’t, then your students won’t.

You also have to care about each individual student, and if you’ve been teaching for any length of time, you know that it is easier for some than for others.

So, how do you describe all of the skills and talents required to be a great teacher in a way that is to the point?

That’s where we come in.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample teacher resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best teacher resume you possibly can.

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Teacher Resume (Text Version)

CONTACT INFO:

Thomas Greenfield
tgreenfield@email.com
(301) 598-0988
Bowie, MD 20715
linkedin.com/tgreenfield

SUMMARY STATEMENT

Teacher: Energetic, compassionate, and results-oriented teacher. Implements effective teaching strategies to meet the unique needs of all student learners. Develops engaging and creative lesson plans to stimulate the minds of students and delivers effective classroom management strategies in order to address behavioral concerns and maintain a productive learning environment. Demonstrates the ability to work closely with school stakeholders including students, parents, staff, and community members.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

  • Effective Communication
  • Organization
  • Problem Solving
  • Lesson Plans
  • Classroom Management
  • Time Management
  • Learning Strategies
  • Relationship Building

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

B. Smith High School
Teacher | Charlotte, NC | August 2017-Present

  • Creates daily lesson plans covering multiple subject areas
  • Delivers instruction for the needs of all students by adapting lessons for diverse groups of students
  • Utilizes technology and creativity to develop fun activities that promote academic achievement
  • Grades assignments and maintains records of all student progress/li>
  • Communicates with parents to discuss student progress and recommend additional academic supports

Lawrence Middle School
Teacher | Bowie, MD | June 2014 – August 2017

  • Implemented effective classroom management strategies to diffuse behavioral conflict among students
  • Employed strategic instructional methods that enhance academic development
  • Ensured students were prepared to meet state testing standards by offering additional study sessions 

Weston Middle School
Teacher | Bowie, MD | June 2011 – June 2014

  • Promoted a positive and productive classroom environment by building rapport with each student
  • Designed lesson plans to meet the unique needs of students while managing a classroom of 30 learners
  • Maintained high standards for students by encouraging the use of critical thinking skills for assignments
  • Provided constructive written and verbal feedback to promote academic achievement 

EDUCATION/CERTIFICATION

Bachelor of Arts in Middle Grades Education
University of Maryland, Bowie, MD
May 2011

Formatting

The initial thing to consider when writing your teacher resume is formatting.

While your resume summary is the first thing that you will write, the first thing a hiring manager is going to notice is the format.

When it is estimated that hiring managers only spend about 6-seconds on average when reviewing a resume, you want your format to look professional and polished.

To achieve this look, you will want to use a legible font and a format that has nice spacing to guide the eye for your list of work, skills, and other details.

List things out in reverse chronological order – this will allow you to list your most impressive and recent work experience first.

You will also want to describe your skills and experience using bullet points so that things are easy to read and split up with nice spacing.

Following these basics will create a preferred look for your resume.

Start With Your Resume Summary

To introduce yourself at the top of your resume, you will write a summary.

Your teacher resume summary is a brief paragraph describing who you are as a teacher and what some of your best skills and qualifications consist of.

The goal here is to be as detailed as possible while still being particular enough to keep the summary to just a few sentences.

So, pick out a few unique details and traits that you feel are some of your best.

Yes!

Energetic, compassionate, and results-oriented teacher. Implements effective teaching strategies to meet the unique needs of all student learners. Develops engaging and creative lesson plans to stimulate the minds of students and delivers effective classroom management strategies in order to address behavioral concerns and maintain a productive learning environment. Demonstrates the ability to work closely with school stakeholders including students, parents, staff, and community members.

No!

Great and energetic teacher. Implements teaching strategies to meet the needs of students. Develops lessons and handles classroom management strategies. Works closely with school stakeholders

The “Yes!” example describes how the candidate conducts themself as a teacher using powerful and varied speech that sets them apart from other candidates.

The “No!” example describes the same candidate in a way so basic and to the point that their unique dynamic abilities are lost in translation.

PRO TIP: If you are struggling to come up with what to say in your summary, start writing the rest of your resume, and as you describe your work history or education, you might find what your best qualities as a teacher are.

Key Accomplishments/ Skills & Qualifications

Once you have produced a short statement about yourself, you will want to list out a few key accomplishments and skills that qualify you for the position.

Listing these details out in bullet point format will allow a hiring manager to view and read them more quickly than they would in paragraph format.

Always review the job post and try to list things that pertain specifically to that position whenever possible.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Critical Thinking
  • Effective Communication
  • Differentiated teaching methods
  • Problem Solving
  • Microsoft Office
  • Organization
  • Creativity
  • Advanced Subject Matter Expert

When trying to decide what skills to include in this section, please note that there are two types of skills – hard skills and soft skills.

Hard skills are known as technical skills, and they are:

  • Teachable
  • Practicable
  • Easy to Quantify
  • Technical

Soft skills are known as people skills, and they are:

  • Personality Traits
  • Subjective
  • Harder to Quantify
  • Innate
  • Not necessarily teachable

Both skills are necessary for any well-rounded teacher – make sure you create a list that includes a healthy balance of both.

PRO TIP: When attempting to come up with suitable skills and qualifications to include on your resume, reference the job posting to make sure you list as many items that match up with what they are seeking as possible.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Writing Your Work Experience

Your work history will make up the bulk of your resume.

If the summary of your resume is the outline, then the work history is the essay where you lay everything out in detail.

The summary and work history should go hand in hand – the ideal work history should reinforce any skills and qualifications you claimed to have in your summary.

To put your best foot forward, you will want to list your work history in reverse chronological order so that your most recent work is listed first.

The goal of this “rule” is to show off your most outstanding work – generally speaking, your most recent job is going to be the most impressive.

Once you decide the best jobs to include, based on relevance, you will want to describe each position briefly with a few bullet points.

Yes!

B. Smith High School | Teacher | Charlotte, NC | August 2017-Present
• Creates daily lesson plans covering multiple subject areas
• Delivers instruction that addresses the needs of all students by adapting lessons for diverse groups of student learners
• Utilizes technology and creativity to develop fun activities that promote academic achievement
• Grades assignments and maintains records of all student progress
• Communicates with parents and guardians to discuss student progress and recommendations for additional academic supports

No!

B. Smith High School | Teacher | Charlotte, NC | August 2017-Present
• Creates daily lesson plans
• Delivers instruction
• Uses technology to promote academic achievement
• Grades assignments and maintains records
• Corresponds with parents and guardians

The “Yes!” example employs details that describe each job task in a way that reinforces key skills like adaptability, creativity, communication, and general student care.

The “No!” example lays out each job task in a way that feels mundane and nearly robotic – no one wants that teacher.

PRO TIP: When thinking through how to describe each job, make a simple list of daily, weekly, or monthly tasks you completed, and then go through the list. Pick out tasks that you feel will best exemplify your abilities and what the job entailed, then start to describe it in more detail.

(If you lack work experience, see below for a helpful section.)

A Word About Bots

In this day and age, it is becoming increasingly common for hiring managers to use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), or bots, to go through resumes.

Bots work by scanning resumes for specific keywords that describe the ideal candidate they are seeking.

When a bot reads a resume that has “good candidate potential,” it will flag the resume for further review.

If your resume doesn’t get flagged by a bot, it will likely not be given another glance.

To combat this, some people have started writing their job history descriptions using paragraph format to try and pack in as many keywords as possible.

Standard bullet point format:

Lawrence Middle School | Teacher | Bowie, MD | June 2014 – August 2017

  • Implemented effective classroom management strategies to diffuse conflict and behavioral concerns among students
  • Employed strategic instructional methods that enhance academic development
  • Ensured students were prepared to meet state standards during the end of grade testing by offering additional study sessions after normal school hours

Paragraph format:

Lawrence Middle School | Teacher | Bowie, MD | June 2014 – August 2017
Implemented effective classroom management strategies to diffuse conflict and behavioral concerns among students, while employing strategic instructional methods that enhance academic development. Ensured students were prepared to meet state standards during the end of grade testing by offering additional study sessions after normal school hours.

A third option is to write out your job description in paragraph format and then include a few bullet points to point out a few key details that you want to stand out visually.

Lawrence Middle School | Teacher | Bowie, MD | June 2014 – August 2017
Implemented effective classroom management strategies to diffuse conflict and behavioral concerns among students, while employing strategic instructional methods that enhance academic development. Ensured students were prepared to meet state standards during the end of grade testing by offering additional study sessions after normal school hours.

  • Department Chair
  • Conduct Testing

It is possible to catch the eye of a bot while using bullet point format as long as you are intentional about the inclusion of keywords – and this format will please most hiring managers as well.

At Big Interview, we recommend a standard bullet point format for this reason.

Writing Your Education Section

By this point, the bulk of your teacher resume is complete, and there are just a few remaining details to include.

Your education section will incorporate a list of your degrees (Bachelor’s, Master’s, etc.).

Make sure that you list out any concentrations or minors that go along with any of the degrees you list.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts in Middle Grades Education
University of Maryland, Bowie, MD
May 2011

In this section, you will also want to include a list of any certifications or licenses.

  • Teacher Licensure Program, May 2012 Middle Childhood Education Science and Social Studies
  • Reading Endorsement (K-12)

Possible Sections to Include

Once you have listed all relevant work experience and a comprehensive overview of your education, you will have the option to include additional sections.

Some sections to consider including are:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

What if You Have no Experience to Include in Your Teacher Resume?

If you have been pulling your hair out because you lack work experience due to a recent career shift or you are a recent graduate, this section is for you.

The first thing you will want to do is move your education section below your summary.

If you have no work experience or you only have unrelated work experience, your education section will appear more impressive than your job history.

You will also want to polish up your education section to make it shine just a bit more.

There are various options for how to do this, and they include, listing an impressive GPA, any honors or awards, or any particular coursework that would apply to the position or school district.

Always include any internships, student teaching, and volunteer work that applies as well – these details will show that you have experience even if it wasn’t paid.

As you think through these details, you may find that you have more to work with than you initially thought – stay optimistic and confident!

Resume Points to Remember

Check your work

Just like you want your students to check their work, you will want to read through and revise your teacher resume. If possible, always get a second opinion or read it aloud to yourself (this will allow you to hear things more accurately to how others will read them).

Don’t forget your name

Every teacher has dealt with this issue when students of all ages hand in assignments. This can happen to adults as well. When writing your teacher resume, make sure to double-check the basics and make sure your name, contact information, and any necessary links are included in an easily visible location.

Use variety 

When selecting powerful keywords to describe yourself and your work, make sure you aren’t reusing words. Add a little flare and variance to your diction – just make sure that the words you select describe things accurately. This is the time to stand out, and redundancy won’t help with that.

Try to Avoid

Creativity is key, but not always

When writing your resume, it is important to stand out, specifically when it comes to skills and qualifications. However, when trying to stand out, keep your format straightforward and your font selection legible. Creativity is crucial, just make sure your resume format is easy to follow and that it highlights key details.

Don’t hand in a two-pager

In nearly every field of work, the person reviewing your resume doesn’t have the time to spend on it. Keep your resume to one page – handing in a two-page resume will only show that you weren’t selective enough in narrowing down your best qualities. Your resume should highlight key skills and experience – it is not a biography.

Don’t use pronouns

Using words like “I” and “me” on your teacher resume is a big no-no. First off, it is already implied that you are talking about yourself, and secondly, these words are generally regarded as faux pas on a resume.

Some Helpful Tools

Power Words

  • Administered
  • Adept
  • Built
  • Created
  • Consolidated
  • Coordinated
  • Developed
  • Designed
  • Founded
  • Formulated
  • Implemented
  • Improved
  • Initiated
  • Launched
  • Pioneered
  • Organized

Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
Classroom Management Organization
Learning Strategies Creative
Written/Verbal Communication Problem Solving
Technology/Microsoft Office Relationship Building
Positive Student Support Services Time Management