Where would we be without tech support?

In the digital age, the professional world relies upon technology in nearly every aspect.

But so often that technology fails or runs into problems.

This is where you come in!

Tech support is a vital component to countless industries and companies. As a technical support specialist, you will have access to multiple avenues of employment.

Your expertise is always sure to be in high demand.

But first you’ll have to sell your skills and expertise to clients and employers.

This process starts with a great resume.

In the following article, we’re going to help you write a polished and impressive resume that will enable you to get about doing the work you love!

So where to begin?

We’re going to guide you through the essentials of good resume writing.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample tech support resume to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best tech support resume you possibly can.

Find Resume Advice in Your Industry

Browse our categories of resume samples to get industry-specific advice on writing your next resume.

Tech Support Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Joshua Williams
joshwilliams@email.com
1 (909) 172-0473
San Bernardino, CA 92376
linkedin.com/joshwilliams

Summary Statement:

Technical Support Specialist: Experienced Tech Support Specialist with knowledge of multiple systems/applications. Adept at troubleshooting and learning new concepts. Skilled in security management, website and software functionality, internet connectivity, and general IT issues.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Networks (VPNS, WLANS)
  • MS Office
  • IT Troubleshooting
  • Communication
  • Timetables
  • Customer Service
  • Details

Professional Experience:

Spahn Manufacturing | San Bernardino, CA
Tech Support Specialist | May 2017 – Present

  • Develop training programs for employees
  • Maintain software and network for company
  • Report weekly to IT Manager
  • Provide full technical support for company systems and software
  • Implement timely solutions to technical problems

VW Blogs | San Bernardino, CA
Tech/Customer Support Specialist | March 2015 – March 2017

  • Instructed platform users with solutions to problems
  • Modified platform as needed via programming alterations
  • Found resolutions to network connectivity issues
  • Created backups of company servers
  • Recovered user/system data when required
  • Assured network security through installation of firewalls and anti-virus software

Peterson International Group | San Bernardino, CA
Tech Support Specialist | June 2012 – December 2014

  • Responded to customer inquiries involving billing, technical issues, and services
  • Operated within technical support team to monitor company systems and web hosting platforms
  • Helped small businesses achieve their goals through technical recommendations
  • Coordinated automated networks and datalinks
  • Executed preventative maintenance and system updates

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Concentration: Computer Science

Nevada State College, Henderson, NV,
Class of 2012

Formatting

As a tech support specialist, you know all about troubleshooting and problem solving. There is a structure and method by which you perform your work.

A good resume also follows certain guidelines. Observing these guidelines will produce a fail-safe document that demonstrates your skills and value.

Formatting and language are two of the key elements of resume writing.

In a job market currently flooded with applicants, many companies now use scanning bots to search resumes for relevant keywords and language.

Keep this in mind as you’re putting your tech support resume together.

Your resume needs to be scannable.

When your resume comes before the eyes of a hiring manager, it will be looked over for approximately 6 seconds.

This isn’t much time to make an impression, so your resume has to be highly readable.

Part of achieving reliability with your tech support resume, is making sure that the most relevant information reaches the reader quickly.

This is why you should use reverse chronological order for your resume’s layout.

Your most recently acquired skills and current position will be seen sooner rather than later.

Font selection is also important. Choose a sensible and clean font, nothing outlandish or cluttered.

Scannability is achieved in part through good use of white space. Make certain that you space your columns and lists correctly.

No clutter on the page!

Creating A Resume Summary

The first section of your tech support resume is comprised of a summary of your expertise and areas of skill.

The summary is an opening salvo of sorts, your chance to make a great first impression.

If effective, your summary will make the reader want to know more about you.

In 2-3 sentences sum up who you are professionally. Show that you’re good at what you do. Demonstrate your value as a candidate.

Be succinct, but not general.

PRO TIP: It used to be commonplace to begin a resume with a statement of objective – what you are seeking in a position. However, this is now an outdated method and considered unprofessional. Your goal is to emphasize your best skill points right off the bat. Show them why you’re the best candidate.

Let’s take a look at what makes for an effective summary and what pitfalls to avoid:

Yes!

Experienced Tech Support Specialist with knowledge of multiple systems/applications. Adept at troubleshooting and learning new concepts. Skilled in security management, website and software functionality, internet connectivity, and general IT issues.

No!

Tech Support guy with lots of knowledge. I can learn new things and I’m the man for the job. Security, websites, software functionality, I can help with all the IT issues you may encounter.

The “Yes!” example is a simple yet effective summary that highlights key skill areas and communicates wide experience.

Power words are used to convey ability, confidence, and energy.

Our “No!” example mentions some skill areas, but they are not supported by the surrounding language.

Use of the first person as well as a general attitude of unprofessionalism makes this summary weak and ineffective.

Remember, your summary will be your first impression.

So make it a good one!

Take time with your word choice. Write several drafts. Experiment.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

Your summary is a paragraph. While it’s important as an introduction, you need something easier to read in order to drive home your value as a candidate.

This is why we suggest putting together a list of your Key Accomplishments, or Areas of Expertise.

Remember your skills are what sets you apart from other applicants!

Use bullet points for your formatting in this section.

Example:

  • Networks (VPNS, WLANS)
  • Languages (SQL, JAVA, HTML)
  • MS Office
  • IT Troubleshooting
  • Communication
  • Timetables
  • Customer Service
  • Details

So this is a list of two types of skills.

Hard skills and Soft skills.

What’s the difference?

Hard skills are skills you acquired on the job or in job training/education. They refer to your strongest areas of expertise.

Soft skills have to do with your natural abilities.

Critical thinking, analytical ability, and communication skills – these are soft skills.

Your bulleted list should represent a balance of these two skill types.

PRO TIP: We generally know or have an idea of what we’re good at. But if you need some help, ask former coworkers, employers, or consult performance records for a refresher/reminder.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Putting Together Your Work Experience

Now we move on to the section of your tech support resume in which you’ll demonstrate how you’ve been using your skills.

This is your work experience section.

Here you’ll list the positions you’ve held that pertain to the new role you’re seeking.

In some cases, such as lack of experience, you’ll have to include other jobs and roles, but we’ll discuss that in a bit.

Use reverse chronological order to list the positions you’ve held. This means start with your most recent job and then work backwards through time to the beginning of your career.

First, list the basics:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

It is common practice to include dates of employment as well. However, sometimes dates are left off a resume because of significant gaps of time between positions, or short periods of employment.

If you do choose to leave dates out, be aware that you will be asked about time gaps in an interview context. Employers are going to want to know all about lengths of employment.

After getting down the basics of the company and job, move on to listing your day to day roles within the position.

Use bullet points and power words to summarize your functions while employed.

Remember that power words convey action and ability.

3-5 bullet points should be sufficient to communicate your responsibilities while at each job.

Examples for reference:

Yes!

Spahn Manufacturing | San Bernardino, CA | Tech Support Specialist | May 2017 – Present

  • Develop training programs for employees
  • Maintain software and network for company
  • Report weekly to IT Manager
  • Provide full technical support for company systems and software
  • Implement timely solutions to technical problems

No!

Spahn Manufacturing | Tech Support Specialist

  • Did training programs
  • Software and networking for company
  • Spoke with manager sometimes
  • >Supported IT company systems and software

The first entry example demonstrates a solid professional with pointed experience in the tech field.

Strong power words are used to give each role a sense of competence and authority.

The overall impression made is that the candidate is someone to depend upon.

The second example lacks crucial information in the heading, leaving out the location and dates of employment.

The bullet points are too general and poorly worded.

Overall nothing of much value can be gained from the entry – that’s not what you want!

PRO TIP: Remember that your Work Experience entries should demonstrate your skills in action. Even a mundane daily role should be highlighted if it’s relevant to the position you’re seeking. Use a suitable power word to bring life to your description.

More On Bots

We mentioned bots at the start of this article.

They function through Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS), scanning resumes for relevant language and keywords.

If you know that your potential employer is using an ATS, you can consider making some formatting alterations, particularly to your Work Experience section.

For instance, use a paragraph instead of bullet points for your work history entries.

Instead of this:

Spahn Manufacturing | San Bernardino, CA | Tech Support Specialist | May 2017 – Present

  • Develop training programs for employees
  • Maintain software and network for company
  • Report weekly to IT Manager
  • Provide full technical support for company systems and software
  • Implement timely solutions to technical problems

Try something like this:

Develop comprehensive training programs for employees. Maintain software and network for the company. Report weekly to the IT Manager and team. Implement timely and suitable solutions to technical problems.

Another alternative would be to use a paragraph with limited bullet points to emphasize certain roles of note:

Develop comprehensive training programs for employees. Maintain software and network for the company. Report weekly to the IT Manager and team. Implement timely and suitable solutions to technical problems.

  • Provide full technical support for company systems and software
  • Received performance award during second year

A paragraph provides you with some advantages when dealing with an ATS. More text allows for more keywords and relevant language.

However, a significant downside is a decrease in readability – paragraphs are harder to read for a human.

So unless you’re absolutely sure that an ATS is going to be your biggest obstacle, we advise sticking with bullet points alone.

Education Details

The typical resume wraps up with a section of education credentials.

Here you will list the institution(s) you attended and degree(s) earned.

Start by putting down the highest level of education you’ve attained.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

Now work backwards, just like with your work history.

Include concentrations, certifications, and minor degrees as well.

You can even add your GPA. It will help boost your value if you lack experience. You can always remove it later on down the line in your career.

The same holds true for academic accomplishments like being on the Dean’s List.

Example:

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Concentration: Computer Science
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV,
GPA: 3.8
Class of 2012

Also, consider adding ways in which you’ve expanded your professional knowledge.

Example:

  • “Tech Today,” Professional Workshop, San Diego, CA
  • “IT for You,” Online Seminar

Additional Section

The resume structure is flexible enough to allow for an additional section should you require it.

An extra section can include special accomplishments that don’t quite fit in with the other sections of your tech support resume.

Example:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience

Whether you’re a new graduate just starting out in the professional world, or someone who is in the middle of changing careers, little or no experience can be a challenge when trying to get your foot in the door.

But there are some things you can do with your resume that will make the task easier for you.

For instance, consider moving your education details. Place them under your summary.

Why?

Because if you lack experience your education is going to be crucial to demonstrating your value as a candidate.

Your work history is going to be a challenge if you have little to no experience in your chosen field.

But don’t let the challenge frighten you away from writing your tech support resume!

In listing the work experience you do have, try and tailor your bullet points to be as relevant as possible.

So you’re seeking a career in tech support. Consider things you’ve done or skills you’ve acquired that can help you in your new role.

For instance, have you ever held a job that required organization and troubleshooting?

Have you ever dealt with customers?

Have you worked according to a set timetable or on a deadline?

What about experience with computers?

All of these skill points could prove valuable to you!

Some Things to Remember

It should go without saying, but we need to remind you to list your contact information on your resume page.

It can be surprisingly easy to forget.

So jot down your email address or LinkedIn profile, just make it simple for them to get in touch with you.

Spacing

Hopefully we’ve shown you how to use your space wisely. Start with your resume summary, followed by skill points, your work experience, and finally your education details.

Power Words

Power words really are a tremendous asset. Choose them wisely and they will certainly make an impact on the reader. Remember to use a variety of them!

A Proofreader

A second set of eyes are always helpful. Have a trusted person give your resume a look over when you’ve finished. More than likely they will catch something you missed!

Resume “Don’ts” to Remember

Here are some mistakes or errors you should avoid making.

First person language

Don’t use first person language in your summary or elsewhere on your resume. While writing “I” or “me” may feel natural, it is incorrect and unprofessional.

One page

A single page is all you should need. If you feel you need to exceed one page, then you need to do some trimming. All your relevant skills and experience can be condensed to fit.

Repetition

Writing something more than once will not make it stick in the mind of a hiring manager. Rather they will gain an impression of you as un-serious and even lazy. Keep your language varied!

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Fonts or formatting

Remember that your two chief goals are readability and scannability. An odd font or weird formatting will not help you achieve these!

Helpful Tools:

Tech Support Resume Power Words

  • Developed
  • Maintained
  • Reported
  • Provided
  • Implemented
  • Instructed
  • Modified
  • Found
  • Created
  • Recovered
  • Assured
  • Responded
  • Helped
  • Operated
  • Coordinated
  • Executed

Tech Support Resume Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
Networks (VPNS, WLANS) Communication
Languages (SQL, JAVA, HTML) Customer Service
MS Office Timetables
IT Troubleshooting Detail Oriented