Ever since the advent of the internet, web developers have been in high demand, and that demand keeps expanding.

This field provides a great way to make a living, often with flexible hours and boundless opportunities for expansion and skill growth.

Whether you’re working for a sophisticated IT company, or serving private clients, your role as a website developer is sure to bring you a fruitful career.

So you have the skills and education, but how do you get started?

How do you land jobs?

Well that’s where we come in!

We’re going to give you the steps on how to write the perfect resume. With our guidance, you’ll compose a document that will demonstrate your full value and expertise to clients and employers.

The following article will outline the basics for you.

Summary

  1. Resume Template
  2. Formatting
  3. Writing Your Resume Summary
  4. Areas of Expertise
  5. Writing Your Work Experience
  6. Writing Your Education Section
  7. Additional Sections
  8. Resume Points to Remember
  9. Resume “Don’ts” to Remember
  10. Some Helpful Tools

Let’s begin with a sample web developer to demonstrate how all the resume pieces fit together. Then we will break each section down to really drill into how to write the best web developer resume you possibly can.

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Web Developer Resume (Text Version)

Contact Info:

Derek Taylor
derektaylor@email.com
1 (423) 868-0078
Chattanooga, TN 37350
linkedin.com/derektaylor

Summary Statement:

Web Developer : Professional Web Developer with broad experience in website functionality and web application solutions. Skilled at delivery and maintenance of web software and accustomed to functioning within a team of top-performing developers and IT support experts. Highly experienced in programming and scripting languages including Java, HTML, and SQL.

Key Accomplishments/Areas of Expertise

  • Java
  • HTML/HTML5
  • SQL/ MySQL
  • Javascript
  • Ecommerce
  • Creative Ideas
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • Analysis
  • Adaptability

Professional Experience:

Johnson Communications | Chattanooga, TN
Senior Web Developer | August 2016 – Present

  • Design, code, and modify websites for clients
  • Evaluate website layouts and functionality
  • Apply knowledge to a variety of technical issues and problems
  • Work closely with clients concerning expectations and business models
  • Plan and deliver software platforms

Tekken Labs | Nashville, TN
Web Developer | January 2013 – June 2016

  • Created interactive websites on various platforms
  • Collaborated with IT team on website application builds and troubleshooting
  • Communicated frequently with global stakeholders
  • Utilized programming languages to create website features and user-friendly content

Samson IT Solutions | Chattanooga, TN
Web Developer | August 2010 – December 2012

  • Responsible for design, development, and management of web pages
  • Assembled e-commerce website applications for businesses
  • Focused on innovative approaches and dynamic features
  • Assessed website application security, functionality, and stability

Education/Certifications

Bachelor of Arts, Information Science
Concentration: Web Design

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN,
Class of 2010

Correct Formatting

As a web developer, you understand that functionality is key. Every website requires the right programming and components to assure smooth performance.

Your web developer resume is also like that.

There are formatting rules to follow in order to achieve an effective outcome.

Two main goals to work towards are scannability and readability.

Many companies today use software bots to scan resume submissions for relevant keywords and language.

Achieving scannability means formatting your resume in a way that will satisfy these bots.

Once your resume has been scanned it will be read.

But understand that a hiring manager will only spend an average of 6 seconds looking your resume over.

This is why readability is also an important goal to meet!

To assure that the reader receives the most relevant information in short order, structuring your web developer resume in reverse chronological order is advisable.

This will place your most recent job position first in your work experience section.

Choose a good font that is simple and not outlandish or flourishy.

Readability is also dependent on your use of white spaces. Make sure to align your columns and lists in an orderly fashion.

You’ll want your resume looking clean.

The Resume Summary

Your resume summary will kick things off.

Because it is the content seen first, it needs to make a good impression.

It should leave your reader wanting to know more.

Use 2-3 sentences to sum up your top skills and abilities. Your summary should be a compact glimpse of your suitability for the position.

Even though you don’t have a lot of space to work with for your summary, avoid generalities.

It may take a couple of tries to really nail your language and include the necessary specifics.

A good summary should help the reader gain an immediate idea of your value as a candidate.

PRO TIP: It will help to qualify what type of web developer you are. Are you “highly experienced” or “award-winning”? Details like these really get a summary off to a good rolling start. Remember that you’re looking to impress!

Below are a few summary examples to consider:

Yes!

Professional web developer with broad experience in website functionality and web application solutions. Skilled at delivery and maintenance of web software and accustomed to functioning within a team of top-performing developers and IT support experts. Highly experienced in programming and scripting languages including Java, HTML, and SQL.

No!

I am a web developer good at making websites functional. I work with experts and make sure that websites are maintained. I work with a team of good developers. I can do and read several programming languages.

Can you spot the key differences?

Why is the first example a preferable summary to the second?

The first is a great snapshot of a solid professional with wide experience and an impressive skill set.

We quickly grasp what areas the candidate excels in.

Power words are used to communicate confidence and ability.

The second example is unprofessional and employs weak language.

The candidate has made frequent use of the first person, which is not acceptable.

We gain no real idea of the candidate’s actual skill level. There is little detail and vague wording.

The candidate may very well be a qualified one, but a poor web developer resume summary will impede progress in actually obtaining an interview and landing the job itself.

Areas of Expertise/Key Accomplishments

To further emphasize your skills, write out a list of your expertise and accomplishments.

Your skills are what make you unique as a candidate, so it’s important to highlight them!

Format your Areas of Expertise as a bulleted list.

Example:

  • Java
  • HTML/HTML5
  • SQL/ MySQL
  • Javascript
  • Ecommerce
  • Creative Ideas
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • Analysis
  • Adaptability

Make sure and get them all.

You may have noticed that the example includes two different types of skills.

These are hard skills and soft skills.

Hard skills pertain to the skills of your field and vocation, while soft skills speak to your personal qualities.

Are you a critical thinker, or good with problem solving?

These are soft skills.

Your Areas of Expertise list should be balanced between the two skill types, to give the reader an overall picture of your full value as a candidate.

PRO TIP: Most of us know what we’re good at. But perhaps you’ve never really thought it out before. Try saying to yourself out loud the areas in which you excel. Or ask a friend or coworker.

(See below for a helpful table of some suggested hard and soft skill ideas to inspire you in writing your skills section.)

Your Work Experience

Now we move on to the main content of your web developer resume, what everything has been leading up to… your actual work experience: where you’ve been and where you’re going in your career.

So how do you go about writing it all down?

Let’s begin with layout.

Reverse chronological order is the best choice for your web developer resume.

You’ll write your most recent position first, which will place your most impressive skill points in the foreground.

Make it easy for the reader!

Now work backwards through your career.

As you lay out your work history, be sure to include:

  • The company name
  • Where the company is located
  • What job you performed there

Remember to include dates of employment, unless you feel you should leave them off.

You might do this because of significant gaps of time between jobs or short periods of employment.

However, keep in mind that you will be asked about missing dates in an interview. Potential employers will want to know all about gaps and brief jobs.

Next, use bullet points to lay out the roles you performed in your various positions.

3-5 bullet points should be sufficient.

Here are some bullet point examples for reference:

Yes!

Johnson Communications | Chattanooga, TN | Senior Web Developer | August 2016 – Present

  • Design, code, and modify websites for clients
  • Evaluate website layouts and functionality
  • Apply knowledge to a variety of technical issues and problems
  • Work closely with clients concerning expectations and business models
  • Plan and deliver software platforms

No!

Johnson Communications | August 2016 – Present

  • Look at websites for people
  • Help layouts
  • Fix problems sometimes
  • I can work with clients

The candidate in the first example appears to be highly skilled and to possess specific knowledge.

Confidence and ability are demonstrated via use of effective power words. This is a professional who looks to be a valuable asset to any employer.

The second candidate has written a rather weak entry. The language is far too vague and crucial information concerning the position is left out.

The bullet points do not use power words to good effect and communicate nothing unique or noteworthy about the candidate’s skills or expertise.

PRO TIP: Consider what you were praised for at former positions. What roles did you excel in? Think about the highlights. You want your work experience entries to reflect areas of highest performance.

More About Bots

Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) use bots to comb resumes for keywords and language.

Not all employers use them, but many do.

If you happen to be particularly worried about an ATS, you can make a formatting change to your work experience section that could prove helpful.

Instead of using bullet points, try a paragraph.

This method will allow you to include more keywords and alter your language to better satisfy bots.

Bullet list:

Johnson Communications | Chattanooga, TN | Senior Web Developer | August 2016 – Present

  • Design, code, and modify websites for clients
  • Evaluate website layouts and functionality
  • Apply knowledge to a variety of technical issues and problems
  • Work closely with clients concerning expectations and business models
  • Plan and deliver software platforms

Paragraph format:

Design, code, and modify websites for clients according to specifications. Evaluate website layouts and functionality, with eye towards optimization. Apply knowledge to a variety of technical issues and problems.

Partial bullet points are also an option. This provides an opportunity to highlight certain roles and functions you fulfilled.

Design, code, and modify websites for clients according to specifications. Evaluate website layouts and functionality, with eye towards optimization. Apply knowledge to a variety of technical issues and problems.

  • Work closely with clients concerning expectation and business models
  • Plan and deliver software platforms according to timetables

Keep in mind that, for a reader, a paragraph takes more time to read. This could prove to be a downside if a hiring manager loses patience while reading.

For this reason, it is probably best to stick with bullet points alone.

Writing Your Education Section

Your education has played a crucial role in forming your career path and bank of skills.

If it’s important to your field, it will be important to a hiring manager.

Start your education section by listing the highest level earned.

Example: Master’s Degree, Bachelor’s Degree, High School Diploma, etc.

List the institution you attended, whether a state school or otherwise. Include area of study and degree(s) earned.

Include concentrations and minors, as well as accomplishments like making the Dean’s List.

Inserting your GPA can prove helpful if you’re just starting out and looking for ways to add value to your web developer resume.

Example:

Bachelor of Arts, Information Science
Concentration: Web Design
The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN,
GPA: 3.8
Class of 2010

Also include ways in which you’ve grown your skills since graduating.

Example:

  • “Web Development Today,” Professional Workshop, Dallas, TX
  • “Web Development Advanced Program,” Certification, Online Training

Additional Sections

Are you disappointed that an impressive accomplishment doesn’t seem to fit with the sections on your resume?

You can still include it!

Just create an additional section and list your special work or achievement.

Such as:

  • Awards and honors
  • Publications
  • Noteworthy Projects
  • Social Media Influence
  • Speaking Engagements
  • Hobbies/Interests
  • Volunteer Work

No Experience?

No relevant work experience?

No problem!

There can be a variety of reasons why you lack experience in your chosen field. Perhaps you just graduated or perhaps you are changing careers.

Whatever your case, there are some adjustments you can make in your web developer resume formatting to compensate.

Moving your education section up the page so that it follows your summary is one option.

If your experience is thin, your education is going to be a high-value point for you.

Fill your work experience section with positions and skills that are most relevant to the field you’re pursuing.

Experience in web design, working with or writing content, even online gaming can be relevant to your new role as a web developer.

Have you ever held a position that required maintenance and a troubleshooting attitude?

How about a job managing social media?

You probably have valuable experience under your belt that could help you get to where you’re going and reach your professional goals.

So don’t leave anything out or overlook experience that could count!

Resume Points to Remember

Let’s sum things up with a few helpful tips to be aware of.

Firstly, remember to include your contact information.

List your email address, LinkedIn profile, or phone number as ways of getting in touch with you.

Make use of your space

This tip is important, as you’re seeking to include as much relevant information about your skills as you can. Remember to include your best skills in your summary, followed by your work experience and education sections.

Power words are very helpful

We’ve talked about power words. It cannot be stated enough that good power words are a tremendous asset to a resume. So take the time to find relevant words that will work for your field and skillset.

A proofreader is essential

It is good practice to have someone you trust look your writing over. There is a fair chance they will catch some mistakes you’ve missed.

Resume “Don’ts” to Remember

It’s also helpful to keep in mind some things you’d like to avoid, so let’s take a look at some of those:

Don’t use first person

Using “I” or “me” is incorrect, both in your summary and elsewhere on your resume. You want to use professional language that focuses solely on your skill set.

Don’t go over one page

You should be able to demonstrate your value as a candidate with one page. Multiple pages are not needed unless you happen to be a CEO or exceptionally accomplished.

Don’t use repetitive language

Repeating yourself will do you no favors, even if you feel it saves you time and space. Keep your language varied and use lots of relevant power words.

(We’ve put together a handy table of power words below to use for inspiration.)

Helpful Tools:

Power Words

  • Designed
  • Evaluated
  • Applied
  • Worked
  • Planned
  • Created
  • Collaborated
  • Communicated
  • Utilized
  • Responsible
  • Assembled
  • Focused
  • Assessed
  • Formulated

Skills List

Hard Skills Soft Skills
JAVA Creative Ideas
HTML/HTML 5 Teamwork
Javascript Communication
E-commerce Analysis
SQL/MySQL Adaptability