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Behavioral Interview Questions


Behavioral interview questions are a big part of most job interviews. Employers and hiring managers use these types of questions in order to get an idea if you have the skills and competencies needed for the job.

The rationale is that if they know how you performed in the past it will help give a sense of how you might do in the future.

For you as the candidate, you’ll need to prepare answers (basically “interview stories”) that highlight the different competencies and skillsets the employer is looking for. The problem is most candidates might have a general idea of how to answer these questions, but the answers usually come out way too long and unfocused, and won’t put the candidate in the best light.

That’s why you’ll need to make a concerted effort to create these stories and adapt them to the relevant competencies.

Below is a list of some common behavioral interview questions, and in-depth lessons on how to create the strongest answers to them (including tons of examples).

To truly excel in your job search, you’ll want to consider hiring an interview coach (like Pamela Skillings) or using a training program (like Big Interview) that will provide you with fast and intensive training you’ll need to ace your interview.

Common Behavioral Interview Questions

Here are a few lessons to help you tackle some behavior-based interview questions.

1. Teamwork Interview Questions

If the role calls on being a team player, here’s specific advice on how to show that you work well with others.

2. Leadership Interview Questions

If people may be reporting to you (or you’re a project manager), then you should expect questions about your ability to lead and motivate others.

3. Handling Conflict Interview Questions

Some roles require a lot of interaction with clients or prospective customers (or challenging situations with other employees). The employer may ask for examples of how you handled or defused tricky situations.

4. Problem-solving Interview Questions

If the role requires creativity and critical thinking, then the employer may want to hear about challenging issues/situations that required some innovation or outside-the-box thinking.

5. Biggest Failure Interview Questions

More and more recruiters and hiring managers are asking failure questions. Whether you like it or not, you need to be prepared to have a good answer.

About the Author: Pamela Skillings is one of the nation’s top interview coaches. She is the co-founder of Big Interview and President of Skillful Communications.